I’m currently working on a dining room table with this color in mind (I also plan on a coffee table soon). I’ve been testing out stain colors and dark walnut is currently in the lead. I love the way this coffee table turned out in color. How many coats of stain did you use? Also, did the dark wax make a big difference in color? I was planning on using a satin poly for sealant (mostly because it’s what is most convenient and what I’m accustomed to), but I’m interested in the dark wax after seeing this post. Any recommendations you have are much appreciated.
If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.
I would like to say that the apothecary coffee table is one of the most significant coffee tables in the world. Inspire yourself from old style apothecary coffee tables and make one for your personal from scratch by subsequent a simple step by step seminar. Paint the body of the furniture a washed out white color and let the wooden top unprocessed wood for a best delicate contrast.
“The earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi shrines of Yemen. It was here in Arabia that coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed, in a similar way to how it is now prepared. Coffee seeds were first exported from Eastern Africa to Yemen, as the coffee plant is thought to have been indigenous to the former.Yemeni traders took coffee back to their homeland and began to cultivate the seed. By the 16th century, it had reached the rest of the Middle East, Persia, Turkey, and northern Africa. From there, it spread to Europe and the rest of the world.” [source]

This is also a table made from a repurposed pallet. There’s not much you need to change about the pallet, except rearrange a few boards and make the frame smaller. The fact that each board has a slightly different color tone gives the table a special charm. The hairpin legs are a really nice touch. Check out the full tutorial to find out more about how you can build something similar for your own home.
Use a polyurathane ( I used a Minwax Semi-Gloss ) to seal and protect the finished coffee table. Apply the 1st coat of polyurethane to the entire table. Once dry, add a second coat to the table top. I only generally do one coat of poly on the base. Once the second coat has dried take a sanding block with 400 grit sandpaper and lightly sand all areas you've poly'ed. Then take a clean damp rag to remove the dust and prepare for your final coat of poly.
Like you, I too am benchless. I built the “Mozilla” Molson vice variant from last year’s issue (I forget which) and it comes in handy for a lot of operations. I clamp it down to a piece of plywood that I have covered with formica (actually, it’s two pieces that I have piano-hinged together for easier storage) laid across two sawhorses. As long as lateral thrust is not involved, this is a pretty stable way to work. I also have a Zyliss vise for working on smaller pieces. I’ve made do for nearly forty years with a radial arm saw and circular saw. I have only recently acquired a planer and router table (both on wheels) It makes the garage croweded because also sharing the space are two motorcycles and about 400 board feet of rough sawn Camphor. I currently attend classes in woodworking and this coming semester I’ll be enrolled in a class for handtools only (and sharpening).
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11-2. Pipe clamps, I have about 10 of them with varying lengths of black pipe in 1′ increments. I can switch out the clamps for larger lengths on larger projects, or downsize as needed. (very rarely do I need more than 6 clamps on a project during drying time, and when I do, it’s time for a cup of coffee and a 1/2 hour break while I wait) You keep your initial investment down, and buy them as you need them to increase your collection.

Don’t let the angles on this table scare you away–the design is actually very simple! Just adjust your miter saw from zero to seven degrees for a few of the cuts, and you can create the splayed legs on this basic coffee table. And with the addition of blocks to the front of the legs, it’s easy to fake the look of advanced mortise and tenon joinery. Read on to see how the parts come together.


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I am finally getting to practice my woodworking more after years of collecting tools. By using tool reviews and thinking of the kind of work I would like to do, I have accumulated a nice set of tools without purchasing many mistakes. I decided to use Paul Sellers book and videos and start learning from the beginning. He starts with projects that begin with a small set of tools. One of those tools is a spokeshave. Even though I know much of what is in the first lessons, I have picked up a few new tricks, and am learning to use my tools more efficiently. My most important tools are my workbench and vise. The workbench was tough to build as I was on the floor using hand planes; not a good way to work. I have no jointer; did get a small planer and made a sled for it so I can flatten a board. My tools are in my house, so there is no room for a big table saw or bandsaw. I have a chopsaw and a piece of an old Craftsman tablesaw I got for free. It has to be moved outside to use. A circular saw with a guide is handy. My guide has a plate on which the saw is mounted. The plate slides on aluminum angle (with help of rollers) which is screwed to plywood. Once the initial cut is made in the plywood, the plywood is simply lined up with your cut marks and clamped down.
Mark the table up with various tools to give the table character. I like to use a hammer and a small bit to punch holes in the top that resemble worm holes (see Episode 3 -Part 2 video). You can also run a circular saw blade across to give it individual saw marks (without it being plugged in). Hammers, scraping tools, bolts, pipe wrenches, crow bars, and other tools can be used to mark up the table and give it a unique look. Make sure to keep marks random so they look natural and don't overdo the distressing!

What’s better than a coffee table? Well…two coffee tables. You can put them one on top of the other and make a two-tier table like this one. The idea is both interesting and practical. If you want you could find a way to make the two tiers detachable so you can use them separately whenever you want. Of course, apart from the unusual structure, this table also stands out thanks to its eye-catching color block design. {found on akailochiclife}.
This project actually started with me wanting to build a chair for myself, however I lacked advanced woodworking tools and a workshop. I therefore began making furniture that was as straightforward as possible and could be build easily with simple tools. Most importantly, all parts could be cut at the DIY store where I got my plywood. This meant I didn't need a saw bench or lots of space. The cut parts were easy to transport to my home and I could pretty much build the whole chair on the kitchen table. This inspired me to make other furniture pieces in similar fashion.
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