If you can buy a bunch of tools at one time, you can save a ton on shipping, as the more you buy, the lower the rates. Also, take advantage of free shipping offers. Compare to see where you can get the best deal. Whatever you buy, make sure it is high quality. I have a Nicholson backsaw I bought at a local store before I knew of the woodworking suppliers. It has never been used much, but cuts much slower than saws such as Gramercy or Lie-Nielsen, even though mine have smaller teeth than the Nicholson.
The most commonly purchased claw hammer is the 20 oz. size. It’s heavy enough to easily drive nails but easily manipulated when pulling nails. While wooden handles are picturesque, they may not stand up to the strain if you have to pull a lot of nails. Hammers with a steel handle, or even fiberglass, will be stronger. However, these won’t absorb the vibrations from driving nails the way a hickory handle will. You’ll also need to make sure the fiberglass and metal handles have a rubberized grip for control and comfort. If you’re going to be driving a lot of nails, the wooden handled hammer will be better for reducing stress on your hand, and wrist, too.
This is the side table version of the stylish project we shared previously. In certain configurations, it could function as a coffee table. It’s a design suitable for small spaces. The wooden top has this hollow storage compartment which is great for keeping things like a book, a magazine, the remote control or the phone when relaxing on the sofa. The hairpin legs give the table a slender look.
Disclaimer: Almost any DIY project involves risk of some sort. Your tools, materials, and skills will vary, as will the conditions at your project site. Rogue Engineer has made every effort to be complete and accurate in the instructions provided on this website. Rogue Engineer will not assume any responsibility or liability for damages or losses sustained or incurred in the course of your project or in the use of the item you create. Always follow the manufacturer's operating instructions in the use of tools, check and follow your local building codes, and observe all commonly accepted safety precautions.
The course begins with a quick overview of the history of carpentry, from primitive to modern times. It then teaches you about the most important building materials, fasteners, adhesives, and tools used by carpenters in the modern construction industry. You will then receive an essential outline of safety guidelines and procedures. The course then goes through the crucial steps carpenters must take during construction projects. Here, you will be introduced to the best methods for constructing floor systems, walls, and roof framing, as well as how to make and read plans and elevations. The final section of the course shows you how to close off a structure, including installing windows, exterior doors, and stairs.
Description: In this 6-session class Angela will be guiding as you carve from a pre-roughed blank. (Check in with the store to see which blanks she will have available for this class.) Angela is an experienced, local carver and has designed this class to be fun and creative. This class is run in 6-session increments and may be repeated as needed as it will usually require multiple classes to complete your project. 

Description: In this four day class, we will start with rough lumber and finish with a simple box. Along the way we will teach you how to use the jointer, planer, table saw, and router table This is THE class to take if you are interested in getting started the right way in woodworking. This one will fill up fast, so sign up. soon. Woodworking 101 is strongly recommended for beginners and people looking to review the basics.

Carpenters use wood, plastic, fiberglass, drywall, and other materials to build or repair structures and fixtures. Those working for large contracting companies build wooden forms for poured concrete for tunnels, bridges, sewers, and other public projects. Additionally, carpenters install framing for structures, erect scaffolds, build braces in underground passageways and mines, and construct brattices.

I’ve been wanting an excuse to buy a Kreg Jig for probably a year now, and with a long DIY to-do list of building tables, benches, and more for our living and dining room, I decided now was a good time to make the purchase. This project is in no way sponsored by Kreg Jig, but I was so impressed with how much easier this tool made my life, I just had to share it with you guys! This tutorial (and probably most builds from here on out) will be shown using the Kreg Jig, so if you enjoy building things for your home, I highly recommend getting yourself one! You can purchase the kit I have here: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System.
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