I consider this my “basic” tool list. Although I do not have a dedicated box for these tools, I assure you that they have a great home in cabinets, on shelves, and laying around on benches. When I do need to take my hand tools somewhere, the larger tools end up in a simple tongue and grooved latch box my grandfather owned. The smaller tools are always in my overall pockets. Overalls work great. They have multiple pockets, they’re comfortable, and they protect your upper body and legs. You only have to deal with small chunks of wood getting into the pockets, which can be dealt with if you or your other half are crafty enough to sew some flaps. It doesn’t bother me though. Thanks for your time.
My $0.02 worth. I agree with the thickness planer [mine is 10″] but anything over a 6″ jointer is expensive and space-consuming, so use hand planes as in your later blog. I inherited an 8″ table saw that my dad and I used to build a 12′ outboard boat back in 1955. I’ve used it for ripping, but I’m having second thoughts because of safety issues. Some have suggested a band saw for ripping, which is quieter and safer to use. I gave my router away [and hope to get rid of my Freud biscuit joiner and 6″ jointer]. A quality eggbeater drill works every bit [pun not intended] as well as a power drill, and they cost less. A coping saw and a jewelers saw negate the need for a jigsaw unless you are into making puzzles. Chris Schwarz has a video short on one of the Highland Woodworker series showing how to joint the edge of a board with a plane and a simple jig on the workbench surface. Another reason to bypass the jointer.
A quality wood moisture meter is vital to the long-term success of any woodworking project you put together. Lumber mills try to dry their batches of lumber according to the intended end product destination. That is, if the wood is harvested in the wet Northeast, but is going to be shipped to the arid Southwest, it will be dried more than wood kept in the Northeast for use by woodworkers. The success of your woodworking project, from wood flooring to kitchen cabinets to fine furniture, depends on the correct moisture content levels of the woods you use for your area of the country.
You enjoy working with your hands and are interested in the skilled trades industry. Chances are, you're a perfect candidate for one of the available carpentry schools. A training program can provide you with the creative and technical skills to work with wood in order to create aesthetically pleasing and functional structures, from window frames to kitchen cabinets. And, you can learn what's involved in framing, exterior finishing, roofing, and much more.

When you've selected your lumber, restack the pile neatly. Before heading off, calculate the number of board feet you have pulled just to be sure you have enough. It's advisable to allow for errors, waste and slight changes in plan when purchasing your material. Depending on the material and the complexity of the project I'll typically allow from 10 to 40% extra.

If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.
To best engage with designers and architects, Northwest Hardwoods has expanded its social media reach to include Instagram and Pinterest. Both channels are visually based and aspirational, which will allow Northwest Hardwoods to showcase not only its many types of wood grades and species, but also the beautiful and varied applications for these woods – from cabinets to decking to furniture.
More than a decade ago I spent 2 weeks in Maine aspiring to learn furniture making. On my return home I started enthusiastically planning to turn my basement into a proper shop – with all the “essential” tools I had learned to use. My list reflected my engineer’s preference for buying quality and quickly exceeded $25k in power tools alone (table saw, band saw, joiner, thickness planer, drill press…) even before solving the power, lighting and dust challenges.
Real quick story: Recently, I had to help my brother with some furniture and cabinet issues, but there were a few problems. First he lived 3 hours by car and my wife needed our only car. I’ve had a scooter for a few years, but have only used it for local trips with small needs. Since weather was changing and I needed a break away from my other half, I decided to make the trip. I installed my motorcycle saddlebags to the scooter and loaded the necessary tools for the trip. Where’s the motorcycle? That’s another story. Of course the saddlebags are small and the scooter only had a massive 50cc engine; vrmm, vrmm. Although I have a shop full of electric and traditional hand tools, only the smaller hand tools would make the list for this trip. So, here is the list from that trip: (A few may be missing)
My $0.02 worth. I agree with the thickness planer [mine is 10″] but anything over a 6″ jointer is expensive and space-consuming, so use hand planes as in your later blog. I inherited an 8″ table saw that my dad and I used to build a 12′ outboard boat back in 1955. I’ve used it for ripping, but I’m having second thoughts because of safety issues. Some have suggested a band saw for ripping, which is quieter and safer to use. I gave my router away [and hope to get rid of my Freud biscuit joiner and 6″ jointer]. A quality eggbeater drill works every bit [pun not intended] as well as a power drill, and they cost less. A coping saw and a jewelers saw negate the need for a jigsaw unless you are into making puzzles. Chris Schwarz has a video short on one of the Highland Woodworker series showing how to joint the edge of a board with a plane and a simple jig on the workbench surface. Another reason to bypass the jointer.
Delta 22-590 13 in. portable thickness planer includes: Delta 22-590 13 in. portable thickness planer includes: 3 cutting knives cutter head wrench dust chute with 4 in. port and magnetic blade changing tool. High-speed steel indexed double-sided knives provides 2X blade life and allows for quick blade changes. Oversized cutter head height adjustment handle with indexing ring provides ...  More + Product Details Close
Noncredit carpentry courses are offered by numerous commercial websites, some of which are operated by professional carpenters. These courses generally include instructional videos, woodworking glossaries, diagrams and pictures, as well as access to online forums. These courses do not have prerequisites, and all of the websites offer courses starting at the basic level for those new to carpentry.
Our team at Hermance is seasoned in many years of experience and specially trained to ensure we're able to quickly assist you in finding the right product to meet your needs. In business for over 100 years, Hermance knows wood working equipment top to bottom. Check us out today and see why we're the top choice when it comes to new woodworking machinery. Contact us to learn more about our general woodworking machinery today.
All Alison courses are free to enrol, study and complete. To successfully complete this Diploma course and become an Alison Graduate, you need to achieve 80% or higher in each course assessment. Once you have completed this Diploma course, you have the option to acquire official Certification, which is a great way to share your achievement with the world. Your Alison Certification is:
Convert your Delta Midi-Lathe to a full size Convert your Delta Midi-Lathe to a full size lathe by adding the Delta Midi Lathe Bed Extension. Featuring a modular design so you can connect multiple extensions this extension increases bed length by 25-1/2 in. so you can turn longer spindles. To reduce vibration add 34 lbs. of cast iron ...  More + Product Details Close
I consider this my “basic” tool list. Although I do not have a dedicated box for these tools, I assure you that they have a great home in cabinets, on shelves, and laying around on benches. When I do need to take my hand tools somewhere, the larger tools end up in a simple tongue and grooved latch box my grandfather owned. The smaller tools are always in my overall pockets. Overalls work great. They have multiple pockets, they’re comfortable, and they protect your upper body and legs. You only have to deal with small chunks of wood getting into the pockets, which can be dealt with if you or your other half are crafty enough to sew some flaps. It doesn’t bother me though. Thanks for your time.
A successful joiner can see the full picture of the project he is preparing to run and for SCM woodworking machinery come to his aid with devices made especially for woodworking machinery; devices that allow to not having to perform the mathematical calculations necessary to make a precise angular cut on a circular saw (with our compex for example) or a template that can produce pieces that are exactly identical among them (on our lathe minimax t 124).
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