You can make a coffee table stand out and be interesting from an aesthetic point of view without complicating its design too much. These plans from Abeautifulmess are a perfect example in that sense. This wooden coffee table definitely has what it takes to become a focal point for the living room and to serve as a statement piece for the entire space. Its design is a combination of sculptural and geometric beauty and a contrast between the solid and heavy top and the sleek and delicate hairpin legs.

The next hand tool every woodworker should have is a nail set. In fact, you should have several sizes. They look like awls, and you use them to drive nail heads into the wood so they are flush or right below the surface. This allows you to fill the holes and prepare for staining or painting. The nail setter will usually have either a convex or concave surface to grip the nail better and keep it from sliding off and marring the wood.


Using wood glue and 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the frame you just built (36" x 11") to the 4x4 frame posts. You will use the pocket holes you drilled in the 36" boards. The frame will sit on the edge of the grooves, not inside. See plans for details. The frame should sit flush with the tops of your 4x4's. This will make the bottom 4" off the ground.
The last step is to dry brush over top of the white washed surface. Using a dry brush, I used the same linen white chalk paint from Rust-Oleum and dipped the tip of the brush into the paint. Getting just a little paint on the end of the brush, I then dabbed the brush onto a piece of scrap wood to take off any excess paint. Then, going with the grain of the wood, I used quick strokes. You can add more or less depending on the look you desire!
Looking at the back-right Leg, lay a ½ x ½ dowel along the Leg to act as a spacer. Now place the ends of the Shelf Support and Apron against the Leg as shown. Apply glue to the end of each board, clamp it in place, and then attach it using a drill/driver and 1¼ inch pocket hole screws. Attach the opposite end of each board to the adjoining Leg. Repeat to join the Front Legs with the front Shelf Support and Apron Boards.
I was telling my brother of the different ways I sharpen and he seemed interested in the slab/sandpaper method. When I went to get the extra supplies I picked up a slab of granite, adhesive, and sandpaper for sharpening. When the job was completed, the saw, the can of finish, and the slab with sandpaper were gifted to my brother. I could have shortened my list a little,
The last step is to dry brush over top of the white washed surface. Using a dry brush, I used the same linen white chalk paint from Rust-Oleum and dipped the tip of the brush into the paint. Getting just a little paint on the end of the brush, I then dabbed the brush onto a piece of scrap wood to take off any excess paint. Then, going with the grain of the wood, I used quick strokes. You can add more or less depending on the look you desire!
Mark the table up with various tools to give the table character. I like to use a hammer and a small bit to punch holes in the top that resemble worm holes (see Episode 3 -Part 2 video). You can also run a circular saw blade across to give it individual saw marks (without it being plugged in). Hammers, scraping tools, bolts, pipe wrenches, crow bars, and other tools can be used to mark up the table and give it a unique look. Make sure to keep marks random so they look natural and don't overdo the distressing!
Moving on to the top of the table. This will be assembled identical to the first shelf assembly, but the depth of the plywood will change. Grab a coupld scraps of the barnwood or planks you are going to use on the top. Lay them flat on a table, and lay the plywood on top of them with the pocket holes facing up. Now attach the long boards first using glue and 1.25” pocket hole screws. After those are attached, you can attach the shorter ends. These will attach with both 3/4 and 2.5” pocket hole screws.
Once the vinegar solution dries (or if you decided not to do the solution) you can go ahead and stain the project. First use a rag or air compressor to remove any dust from the table. Then use a clean rag to apply the stain of your choice. Don't forget to wear gloves and ventilate the area. Have a brush in your other hand to stain hard to reach areas.

Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work.

1: Table saw in place of a jointer. Any number of tips in previous issues address straightening edges of boards without a jointer. A jointer serves one purpose, but a tablesaw can serve many (just watch your local Craigslist for a decent one to come up.) The thickness planer is unavoidable, but until you can afford one, buy stock in the thickness you need.


The actual search of the right coffee table able to fit into an already conceived interior design can turn out to be a nightmare as most of you might know. Size, shape, texture, style, color, all of these characteristics merge and contribute to the right coffee table that can be conceived to suit your every need is designed thoroughly. As understood over time, the best course of action when faced with the problem of finding a certain furniture piece to suit an already created interior design is definitely represented by the diy crafting niche. Who better to create exactly what you desire and what will complete your vision than yourself?You can indeed focus all your effort into finding that perfect designer piece but the actual time invest in the search will increase and exceed your budget, prolonging that  long expected finish line represented by the purchase of the last piece of furniture that will definitely be the coffee table.With this idea in mind we have searched for a collection of free available diy coffee table plans that can serve as a starting point in your creative process of designing the perfect piece for your living room. Rustic, modern, glass topped or industrial styled, coffee tables come in all shapes, sizes and colors. Some take storage space into consideration, whilst others emphasize shape and design and do not prioritize functionality. Modern, classical, rustic or roughly industrial, opt for the right style for your home that will fit or contrast the existing overall design. Check out a beautiful collection of glass top coffee tables as well as a selection of 100 modern coffee table designs available for purchase.
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We have a bunch of other interesting designs to show you as well. Some, like this one, are meant to make the area around them feel inviting and cozy so the design is simple and familiar. These coffee table plans come from ana-white. You can make them your own by customizing certain aspects of the project. For instance, you could choose to paint the wood and then give it a distressed look instead of using wood stain.
I want to make some wooden boxes and cases, and I haven't done any wood work till now so I don't have any tools and I can't buy the workshop electronic machines which I see in almost every woodworking instructables here (such as drill, lathe, sanding, saw, mitre, buiskit jointer, and all other electronic tools). So I want to begin with simple hand tools.
India has a long history of fine hand made workmanship so you are in the right place for learning that, unless it has become a vanishing art. I would ask around and see if someone might be able to let you be around them and learn so you can get an idea of what is needed and also some of the tools you might need. Who knows, once you get involved you might decide you like it enough that you could apprentice with someone.

“Basic,” on the other hand, is a word that allows for growth – and that’s exactly what you want in your woodworking tool kit. You want to be able to take the same kit with you through many years in the craft. With my basic woodworking tools list, I wanted to provide a core set of tools that will serve you well from project to project. I’m especially concerned these days with the transition to hardwood furniture making, as opposed to plywood boxes of various sizes. That’s the transition I’m making right now in my own work!
You can make a coffee table stand out and be interesting from an aesthetic point of view without complicating its design too much. These plans from Abeautifulmess are a perfect example in that sense. This wooden coffee table definitely has what it takes to become a focal point for the living room and to serve as a statement piece for the entire space. Its design is a combination of sculptural and geometric beauty and a contrast between the solid and heavy top and the sleek and delicate hairpin legs. 
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