Real quick story: Recently, I had to help my brother with some furniture and cabinet issues, but there were a few problems. First he lived 3 hours by car and my wife needed our only car. I’ve had a scooter for a few years, but have only used it for local trips with small needs. Since weather was changing and I needed a break away from my other half, I decided to make the trip. I installed my motorcycle saddlebags to the scooter and loaded the necessary tools for the trip. Where’s the motorcycle? That’s another story. Of course the saddlebags are small and the scooter only had a massive 50cc engine; vrmm, vrmm. Although I have a shop full of electric and traditional hand tools, only the smaller hand tools would make the list for this trip. So, here is the list from that trip: (A few may be missing)

Thread Related Link and Image Guidelines Thread Related Links posted at WOODWEB's Forums and Exchanges should point to locations that provide supporting information for the topic being discussed in the current message thread. The purpose of WOODWEB Forums is to provide answers, not to serve as an advertising venue. A Thread Related Link that directs visitors to an area with inappropriate content will be removed. WOODWEB reserves the right to delete any messages with links or images it deems inappropriate. (return to form)


The sequence in which boards are cut from a log will determine how stable the boards will be once they dry. As a board loses moisture it will shrink in three dimensions. The change in length is so small as to be considered insignificant and the change in radial movement is always less than the tangential movement. This is most significant as the wood dries between the time it's cut (i.e. green wood), and the point where it is kiln dried or air dried and ready for use. Wood that shrinks excessively, or that has been dried improperly, will often develop checks at the ends. When shopping for lumber, carefully inspect the ends for any checking, or for excessively long checks. It is best to allow for some scrap at the end of each board, just in case. As you trim the end, hit the off-cut across the edge of your bench, and if it breaks in two, you'll have to cut off a little more.
Description: This workshop is designed for those who have recently gotten a wood lathe, or have had one for a while, and haven't gotten around to using it until now. During this workshop students get acquainted with the wood lathe and its parts and accessories. We will cover the turning process, as well as sanding and applying finish to a project while it's on the lathe. Students will also be shown a variety of turning tools and how they function. You will also be introduced to wood selection, tool selection, and tool sharpening. Students will test their skills while working on a small turning project. Students should bring suitable eye protection such as safety glasses, goggles, or a face shield. If you have problems with wood dust, a respirator or dust mask would be advisable. Also bring any wood turning tools you might have. Tools and safety gear will be provided for those who don't own them. Materials for turning will be provided.

Just a little nitpick on the tape measure blurb. The hook should not be completely tight. It should move in and out about a 1/16th or the thickness of the hook. This way you get an accurate measurement whether you hook a part to measure or bump up to it. If you want more accurate measurements with a tape measure, “burn” an inch instead of hooking or bumping the part. Just line up what you want to measure with the 1″ mark and subtract that inch from the final measurement.
Carpentry is one of the most flexible and versatile construction occupations. As a graduate of a carpentry school online, you may work on a wide variety of projects, both indoors and outdoors—from installing kitchen cabinets and drywall to helping construct large-scale projects from the ground up. That versatility is helping to drive job growth: the U.S. Department of Labor expects carpentry careers to grow 8% by 2026.*

Liz Fourez started Love Grows Wild in 2012 with a passion for interior design and homemaking and a dream to help others create a home they love.  From simple project tutorials, to holiday and entertaining ideas, to her journey renovating a 1940’s farmhouse, Liz demonstrates how to create a beautiful and inviting home with a handmade touch. She turned her signature cozy, neutral style into a best-selling book in 2016 and continues to inspire readers with her captivating photography and easy decorating ideas. Read more about Liz > > > >


If you all looking for a a spicy addition to your living room storage space then do choose this pretty wooden coffee table! It comes also with 2 build in drawers that will be a stylish way to store your living room concerns! Design is full of style and milk-choco appeal of coffee table just held all precious and special to eyes! Full directions and DIY guide here hertoolbelt

You might not see these tables very often but they were relied on by sheep farmers for many years. Anything that could make the job of shearing sheep easier was welcomed on the farm. You could even change up the plan a little bit by making the legs longer and adding steel (or wooden) wheels to make a merchants cart. That latter idea is something we are suggesting, its not a part of this plan. Joinery methods used primarily in the construction of this sturdy table include mortise and tenon and tongue and groove. View the Larger Image Slideshow to see the actual paper plan you are buying.


This is a project that proves building furniture can be really easy when you’re creative. This is a rolling coffee table made up of four wooden crates. The crates are joined together with screws and their interiors can be used as storage spaces for books, planters, magazines and personal belongings. The center is hollow and you can either leave it as such or cover it with a piece of wood.
The campaign features a new customer-focused website, new advertising centered on visually-appealing wood applications, and the launch of Northwest Hardwoods’ Pinterest and Instagram accounts to convey visual ideas and aspirations for the many uses of hardwoods. The campaign offers an opportunity for Northwest Hardwoods to reach out to new audiences including designers, specifiers, architects and OEMs, underscoring the fact that no other building and design material is as visually appealing and as sustainable as timber. Additionally, the campaign includes the creation of product specific communications outreach that will support the company’s sales objectives. 

Aside from pallets, lots of other things can also be repurposed into components for a DIY coffee table. For example, this one has a tile top. The frame is made of wood and can be crafted in no time. In fact, you can use some leftover wood pieces and if you also have an extra tile from previous renovations this can prove to be a cheap coffee table which you can build with things you already own.
Doesn’t this table look exquisite? It’s a bit surprising to find out that it’s a DIY piece and that you could make something just as awesome without too much effort. You need some MDF, wooden tapered legs, angle top hardware plates, a jigsaw, a screwdriver and spray paint. The trickiest part is cutting the MDF board and giving it the desired shape. Luckily, there’s a tutorial on thewonderforest which can give you some pointers.
Thanks for the feedback. We’re glad you found the list helpful. Please note that this page contains only 10 of the 40 top tools for woodworking, displaying only hand tools. You can find the next 10 here: https://www.wagnermeters.com/top-40-woodworking-tools-2/. There are links at the bottom of each article to the next group of tools so you can view the entire list. Hope this helps.
Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work. 

Like wooden pallets, the coffee table wine crates are a delightful resource for creating a table from scratch. All that is compulsory in four crates and wheels set if needed. Utilize the central space occasioned from the rates merging to show your beautiful flower vase or candle holder. Therefore, wine crate coffee table is a good woodworking project.
I built my coffee table!! I used the plans at www. EasyWoodwork.org to build mine – highly recommended you check those out too. They are detailed and super easy to read and understand unlike several others I found online. The amount of plans there is mind-boggling… there’s like 16,000 plans or something like that for tons of different projects. Definitely enough to keep me busy with projects for many more years to come haha
×