Rough lumber is sold and measured in ¼" increments; when a board is referred to as 4/4, it means it is four quarters of an inch thick, or one inch. The most common sizes you are likely to encounter at the lumber yard are 4/4 (1"), 6/4 (1½"), 8/4 (2") and 12/4 (3"). Generally, larger dimension lumber is priced per board foot. Price is also dependant upon the wood quality. Boards without blemishes, and of even colour, command higher prices. On most projects it isn't necessary to purchase the best grade material for the entire project. Purchasing a lower grade will allow you to bring home more lumber, and give you the freedom to lay out parts based on appearance rather than waste.
Congrats! You've finished your coffee-table. If you liked building it and are happy with the result you can find other similar designs at www.screwed-up.com. If you want to know what's going on with Screwed-Up you can join the facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/Screwed-Up-2092172627662047/), or maybe you want to follow me on pinterest (https://nl.pinterest.com/screwedupdiyfurniture/pins/). For finishing touches I recommend sanding the edges and corners smooth. Also treating the top with a (clear) wood finish to protect against spills is never a bad idea.
Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it’s inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain very well, so it’s best to use it only when you intend to paint the finished product. Douglas fir is moderately strong and hard for a softwood, rating 4 on a scale of 1 to 4. 

Creativity knows no limits and this chicken coop coffee table proves it. It’s something that we found on findinghomefarms. It’s a one-of-a-kind piece with lots of character, the type of table that makes a statement no matter where you put it. Of course, such a daring and unusual project is not exactly very versatile so you’d need a certain type of decor to make it fit.
To best engage with designers and architects, Northwest Hardwoods has expanded its social media reach to include Instagram and Pinterest. Both channels are visually based and aspirational, which will allow Northwest Hardwoods to showcase not only its many types of wood grades and species, but also the beautiful and varied applications for these woods – from cabinets to decking to furniture.
Wow, what a great problem to have Boris! If you can send some photos I’ll look at them. But unseen, I’d ask them to try to get some quartersawn boards out, and also some full width flatsawn boards. It just depends on how much wood you’ll get if you quartersaw it. It also depends on what you think you’ll build down the road. Some furniture pieces don’t need to be quite as stable as others. Good luck!
The final building step is to lay each plank in place. These will be cut to 20” long each. Attach each piece using wood glue and brad nails. Just make sure the length the nails isn’t longer than the width of the planks and plywood combined. Once you have finished that, you can paint or stain and add your hardware!  Because I was using pre-finished white barn wood from Porter Barn Wood, I painted the table before adding the planks.  Check out these planks….
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