The topic of lumber confused me mainly because I couldn’t find a simple summary of the topic. I found a lot of complex discussions with different terms used by different “experts”. I am by no stretch of the imagination a lumber expert, but I’m very good at simplifying complex topics so that everyone can understand. As a result, this is a simple practical guide to help you understand how wood moves, what wood to buy, how to buy it, and where to buy it.
Along with your materials, there will usually be practical exercises that you can do at home. Illustrated textbooks and study guides, along with instructional videos, will guide you through construction techniques step-by-step. And if you still need additional help, you can always contact your instructor via phone, e-mail, chat or some other method.
My $0.02 worth. I agree with the thickness planer [mine is 10″] but anything over a 6″ jointer is expensive and space-consuming, so use hand planes as in your later blog. I inherited an 8″ table saw that my dad and I used to build a 12′ outboard boat back in 1955. I’ve used it for ripping, but I’m having second thoughts because of safety issues. Some have suggested a band saw for ripping, which is quieter and safer to use. I gave my router away [and hope to get rid of my Freud biscuit joiner and 6″ jointer]. A quality eggbeater drill works every bit [pun not intended] as well as a power drill, and they cost less. A coping saw and a jewelers saw negate the need for a jigsaw unless you are into making puzzles. Chris Schwarz has a video short on one of the Highland Woodworker series showing how to joint the edge of a board with a plane and a simple jig on the workbench surface. Another reason to bypass the jointer.
Training can also offer you the opportunity to specialize in a particular area of this rewarding field, including building maintenance, home renovations, cabinet making, new construction, furniture making, and more. Some programs may even allow you to gain valuable, real-life experience through a paid externship. You'll also learn the latest safety considerations and industry regulations.
Wood tends to rise its general quality and character with the time passage. I would like to say that water wind rain snow possibly transform its porosity and texture and make it more attractive for a table piece. The attractiveness of this coffee table is the reason behind its mostly utilization. So, you can keep in mind this table as an excellent table.
Even after you've applied your chosen finish, wood will continue to move. As the wood absorbs and loses moisture from one season to the next, components can twist and bind. For example, a tall cabinet door with glass panels that I built several years ago tends to curve from top to bottom every time the moisture content in the air goes up. The rails and stiles on the door are quite narrow, so I should have chosen straighter-grained stock when originally selecting my lumber.
Thanks for the feedback. We’re glad you found the list helpful. Please note that this page contains only 10 of the 40 top tools for woodworking, displaying only hand tools. You can find the next 10 here: https://www.wagnermeters.com/top-40-woodworking-tools-2/. There are links at the bottom of each article to the next group of tools so you can view the entire list. Hope this helps.
You’ll need a long screwdriver with a square blade that is very heavy duty. This gives you a lot of torque. You’ll also need a small and medium slot screwdriver. For working on cabinets or tight places in woodworking, you’ll need a screwdriver with a thin shank so that you can reach screws that are inside of deep holes. This is accomplished with a cabinet screwdriver. Get a couple of medium Phillips head screwdrivers, and a stubby one too, for those tight places. You may also want a ratcheting screwdriver.
Just for the record, a jointer and planer are not from the ICDT kit – the philosophy on that column is, indeed, beginner AND basic (hence the Workmate). The tools we suggest in the ICDT manual are for those who are working at a kitchen table or in a backyard; the tools the editors would recommend for someone who is quite sure he or she wants to pursue serious furniture making would be rather different.
Second, I have another call for entries – I have, for some time, wanted to make a “Woodworker’s Vacation Map,” one that would list and plot a wide array of interesting places and sights across the world. Whenever I travel, I ask a few woodworking friends from the area I’m traveling to what I should see. This has exposed me to a wide range of beautiful experiences, often tucked away and lacking signage.
It's generally more difficult to find long boards. Stock under four or five feet long can often be cut from longer boards, but as the parts become longer, the rough stock will have to be either very clear and straight, or have extra thickness to allow you to remove any bow along its length. In making parts for the room divider (featured in this issue), four stiles had to be set aside: three because they kept bowing no matter how often they were jointed flat, and one because it was under the minimum thickness by the time it was flat.
Having completed this course the learner will be able to: - Describe the history and scope of carpentry as a trade; - Identify the opportunities for carpenters in the construction industry; - Classify the various building materials used by carpenters; - List the most commonly used fasteners and adhesives used by people in the carpentry trade; - Explain the different types of hand and power tools available to carpenters; - Outline the general safety procedures and guidelines that should be followed to operate the tools; - Discuss the importance of employee responsibility and human relations to being successful in the trade; - Identify the various types of construction drawings that make a drawing set; - State the guidelines to read and interpret reading plans and drawings, blueprints, and specifications; - List the various terms associated with floor systems, wall, ceiling and roof framing; - Explain the different methods of framing and constructing houses made of wood; - Describe the types of beams/girders and supports used in construction; - Outline the sequence involved in constructing a platform floor assembly; - Summarize the basic procedure for laying out, assembling, and erecting wood frame walls; - Recognize the different types of roofs used in residential construction; - Determine the length of a common rafter required to construct a roof; - Discuss the terms associated with concrete, concrete reinforcing materials, and formwork; - Apply the concrete mixing information to get different types of concrete, designed to suit various purposes; - Explain the basic concrete curing methods and materials; - List the various components of windows, exterior doors, and stairways used in residential construction; - Summarize the basic installation procedure for pre-hung windows; - State the various types of exterior doors used in residential construction; - Identify the essential requirements for framing stairs; - Describe the design and layout techniques used for stairways and stairwells.
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Being without machinery to dimension and dress rough timber myself I can definitely see the benefit, but I think the investment (both in money and space) in machinery like this is premature for ‘basic’ woodworking. Additionally, without some other machinery (table saw, bandsaw) you’re still going to have trouble dimensioning smaller timber for projects from large/rough stock (e.g. producing timber strips for case fronts, ripping to reduce thickness, etc).
One subject that a woodworker must always consider when building a project is how seasonal moisture and temperature fluctuations will cause expansion and contraction of the wood stock in the assembled project. For instance, if you've ever experienced a drawer that sticks only in the winter time, you've experienced seasonal movement of wood. Since each wood species is affected by these temperature and moisture fluctuations, you'll need to know a bit about the climate where the project will be used, and how your chosen wood stock is affected by the climate changes. Again, your local woodworking supplier can be a great resource for answering these types of questions in your area.
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