Coffee tables are from the wide variety of furniture pieces one requires to furnish his home the least taken into consideration from the beginning of the design process.They are often overlooked or taken for granted as pieces not really necessary for the comfort of the home. But despite this initial belief, the coffee table will later on turn out to be a vital element in the proper functionality of a living room as well as small balcony that is used as a coffee break time. The proper coffee table will complete your interior design, will organize and rank your furniture around it, whilst setting the focus of the room to a perfectly positioned key element.
Certain species of wood have traditionally been associated with different styles of furniture. The wood of choice for the Arts & Crafts movement was quarter sawn white oak, valued for its appearance, durability and dimensional stability. An Arts & Crafts style piece executed in maple might be a well-made example of a classic style, but the choice of wood would be visually at odds with the design. Pine and other softwoods impart a more relaxed, country influence, while traditional hardwoods, such as cherry and walnut, are more likely to be associated with fine furniture.
Use a polyurathane ( I used a Minwax Semi-Gloss ) to seal and protect the finished coffee table. Apply the 1st coat of polyurethane to the entire table. Once dry, add a second coat to the table top. I only generally do one coat of poly on the base. Once the second coat has dried take a sanding block with 400 grit sandpaper and lightly sand all areas you've poly'ed. Then take a clean damp rag to remove the dust and prepare for your final coat of poly.
Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it’s inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain very well, so it’s best to use it only when you intend to paint the finished product. Douglas fir is moderately strong and hard for a softwood, rating 4 on a scale of 1 to 4.
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