If you can buy a bunch of tools at one time, you can save a ton on shipping, as the more you buy, the lower the rates. Also, take advantage of free shipping offers. Compare to see where you can get the best deal. Whatever you buy, make sure it is high quality. I have a Nicholson backsaw I bought at a local store before I knew of the woodworking suppliers. It has never been used much, but cuts much slower than saws such as Gramercy or Lie-Nielsen, even though mine have smaller teeth than the Nicholson.
Description: In this 6-session class Angela will be guiding as you carve from a pre-roughed blank. (Check in with the store to see which blanks she will have available for this class.) Angela is an experienced, local carver and has designed this class to be fun and creative. This class is run in 6-session increments and may be repeated as needed as it will usually require multiple classes to complete your project.
Even though this is in fact a side table, we can definitely find inspiration in its design. We find this project to be highly creative and interesting. The table has a hexagon-shaped top and bottom connected by two sets of five rods. Two in each set are longer than the other and go through the bottom hexagon, acting as legs. You can find the plans for this project on ohohblog.
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More than a decade ago I spent 2 weeks in Maine aspiring to learn furniture making. On my return home I started enthusiastically planning to turn my basement into a proper shop – with all the “essential” tools I had learned to use. My list reflected my engineer’s preference for buying quality and quickly exceeded $25k in power tools alone (table saw, band saw, joiner, thickness planer, drill press…) even before solving the power, lighting and dust challenges.
Description: Every woodturner enjoys the opportunity to give handmade ornaments to friends and family during the holidays, especially one that is made purely out of wood. No pre-made ornament kits or ornament hardware will be used in this class. One might call it au naturel!!!! During this class you will be given the opportunity to see various ornaments that have been turned on the lathe, ranging from small and simple to large and more decorative. Class objectives include, but are not limited to, the following: Wood choice (more common ornament wood species and pros and cons of each) Discussion and demonstration on how ornaments can be colored using a variety of markers, paints, dyes, and gilder's paste. Discuss and demonstrate how a variety of gouges and tools can be used to make ornaments, including texturing tools. Sharpening techniques - the instructor will assist all students when sharpening tools Ornament rough sketch and design, before the wood is on the lathe. Most important, every student in class will be given the opportunity to turn at least one ornament of their own. The instructor will assist with basic sketch and design, and will rotate among all students to assist with cuts, tool use, technique, sharpening, and helpful hints. Experience level: Beginner (some turning experience highly preferred) Suggested tools: Turning tools will be supplied; however, students are encourage to bring their own tools if they have them. 3/8" or 1/2" spindle gouge, narrow parting tool, and small roughing gouge is a great start. Students who wish to bring their own chuck may do so as well (1"-8 tpi, 2" or 50mm dovetail jaws, and pin jaws). Lunch break from 12:00 to 12:45
This course introduces students to remodeling practices and demolitions. Students learn how to plan a remodeling project, complete basic plumbing and electrical jobs, apply for permits, match finished materials and estimate costs. Instruction in reading architectural blueprints for residential remodels is generally included, and students become familiar with specifications, codes and construction drawings. Some residential remodeling courses provide hands-on learning experience by requiring group or individual remodeling projects. This course is usually taken after basic carpentry courses.
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Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work.
Hi Alex! I usually only do one coat of stain for darker colors like Dark Walnut. The dark wax doesn’t make a huge difference in the color since the stain is already pretty dark, but I like using wax on furniture to give it more of a natural finish versus a poly. For pieces that get used and abused heavily (like our dining room table) I use a matte finish poly, but for the coffee table wax worked just fine. I hope this helps!
Whether you need a simple sander for your shop or you need a 5-axis, dual process CNC router, we've got you covered. Our product ranges from the most basic woodwork machines to the newest technologies available on the market including CNC machines. We partner with some of the top brands in the industry to ensure you get the highest quality product, at the best possible price.
About forty years ago I purchased a Shopsmith Mark V because I lacked space for a large shop, and also moved around the United States a lot. Later I purchased another Shopsmith Mark V Model 510 for the increase in table size and flexibility. I do wood working as a hobby, not to do many projects as fast as possible. I also have every tool and accessory that Shopsmith makes for the two primary tools. Their quality is excellent, and while I enjoy antique tools like the 1912 three phase electric Camel Back Drill Press I purchased for my son’s shop, the Shopsmith does every thing I have ever needed. 

At the core of the campaign is a new website, which immerses customers in a user-friendly, easy-to-navigate, and informative user experience. Site visitors will find new photography and video, product-specific pages featuring detailed descriptions, a timeline recounting the company’s history, sales maps, and a monthly blog. Built with the future in mind, the site’s foundation allows for the eventual expansion to include real-time inventory tracking, sample requests, and more.
We are all well aware of the role of a DIY coffee table for a living room which is highly versatile! It is what you need to get first while entertaining some visitors or guests in the living room! The conversations are also to start always by sitting around it! It is seen mostly in the center of the sitting plans! The reason is that all the sitting personages can use it to place their mobile phones, cups, beverage mugs, magazines and other materials over it while they need to get their hands free for the detailed conversations! So this all tells that how utilitarian item a coffee is!
Liz Fourez started Love Grows Wild in 2012 with a passion for interior design and homemaking and a dream to help others create a home they love.  From simple project tutorials, to holiday and entertaining ideas, to her journey renovating a 1940’s farmhouse, Liz demonstrates how to create a beautiful and inviting home with a handmade touch. She turned her signature cozy, neutral style into a best-selling book in 2016 and continues to inspire readers with her captivating photography and easy decorating ideas. Read more about Liz > > > >
Wood tends to rise its general quality and character with the time passage. I would like to say that water wind rain snow possibly transform its porosity and texture and make it more attractive for a table piece. The attractiveness of this coffee table is the reason behind its mostly utilization. So, you can keep in mind this table as an excellent table.
Basic kitchen design, construction joints, cabinetry terms, standard cabinet sizes and wood joinery are usually introduced in this course. Students may also learn about hardwood and softwood cabinet types, sheet materials, fasteners and power tool operations. Different sizes and types of cabinets, such as upper and base cabinets, are generally covered, and students may participate in a hands-on project building cabinets or counter tops. Because of this course's specialized nature, it may be taken as an elective or at the end of a program.
Maple comes in two varieties: hard and soft. Both varieties are harder than many other woods; hard maple is so hard (a 5 on a scale of 1 to 5) that it’s difficult to work with. Soft maple, on the other hand, is relatively easy to work with. Because of their fine, straight grain, both varieties are more stable than many other woods. They also tend to be less expensive than other hardwoods. You won’t find maple at your local home center, but most lumberyards have a good selection of it.
Industrial carpenters work on civil engineering projects and in industrial settings, where they build scaffolding and create and set forms for pouring concrete. Some industrial carpenters build tunnel bracing or partitions in underground passageways and mines to control the circulation of air to worksites. Others build concrete forms for tunnels, bridges, dams, power plants, and sewers.

I am finally getting to practice my woodworking more after years of collecting tools. By using tool reviews and thinking of the kind of work I would like to do, I have accumulated a nice set of tools without purchasing many mistakes. I decided to use Paul Sellers book and videos and start learning from the beginning. He starts with projects that begin with a small set of tools. One of those tools is a spokeshave. Even though I know much of what is in the first lessons, I have picked up a few new tricks, and am learning to use my tools more efficiently. My most important tools are my workbench and vise. The workbench was tough to build as I was on the floor using hand planes; not a good way to work. I have no jointer; did get a small planer and made a sled for it so I can flatten a board. My tools are in my house, so there is no room for a big table saw or bandsaw. I have a chopsaw and a piece of an old Craftsman tablesaw I got for free. It has to be moved outside to use. A circular saw with a guide is handy. My guide has a plate on which the saw is mounted. The plate slides on aluminum angle (with help of rollers) which is screwed to plywood. Once the initial cut is made in the plywood, the plywood is simply lined up with your cut marks and clamped down.
Products and systems by Lamello have always been Products and systems by Lamello have always been designed for longevity and reliability. This legendary durability is combined with environmental stewardship in view as strict environmental regulations at our production site in Switzerland ensure that all resources are used with consideration many of them stemming from sustainable husbandry and management. ...  More + Product Details Close

The next hand tool every woodworker should have is a nail set. In fact, you should have several sizes. They look like awls, and you use them to drive nail heads into the wood so they are flush or right below the surface. This allows you to fill the holes and prepare for staining or painting. The nail setter will usually have either a convex or concave surface to grip the nail better and keep it from sliding off and marring the wood.
Description: Every woodturner enjoys the opportunity to give handmade ornaments to friends and family during the holidays, especially one that is made purely out of wood. No pre-made ornament kits or ornament hardware will be used in this class. One might call it au naturel!!!! During this class you will be given the opportunity to see various ornaments that have been turned on the lathe, ranging from small and simple to large and more decorative. Class objectives include, but are not limited to, the following: Wood choice (more common ornament wood species and pros and cons of each) Discussion and demonstration on how ornaments can be colored using a variety of markers, paints, dyes, and gilder's paste. Discuss and demonstrate how a variety of gouges and tools can be used to make ornaments, including texturing tools. Sharpening techniques - the instructor will assist all students when sharpening tools Ornament rough sketch and design, before the wood is on the lathe. Most important, every student in class will be given the opportunity to turn at least one ornament of their own. The instructor will assist with basic sketch and design, and will rotate among all students to assist with cuts, tool use, technique, sharpening, and helpful hints. Experience level: Beginner (some turning experience highly preferred) Suggested tools: Turning tools will be supplied; however, students are encourage to bring their own tools if they have them. 3/8" or 1/2" spindle gouge, narrow parting tool, and small roughing gouge is a great start. Students who wish to bring their own chuck may do so as well (1"-8 tpi, 2" or 50mm dovetail jaws, and pin jaws). Lunch break from 12:00 to 12:45
Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work.
I’ve been wanting an excuse to buy a Kreg Jig for probably a year now, and with a long DIY to-do list of building tables, benches, and more for our living and dining room, I decided now was a good time to make the purchase. This project is in no way sponsored by Kreg Jig, but I was so impressed with how much easier this tool made my life, I just had to share it with you guys! This tutorial (and probably most builds from here on out) will be shown using the Kreg Jig, so if you enjoy building things for your home, I highly recommend getting yourself one! You can purchase the kit I have here: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System.
What’s better than a coffee table? Well…two coffee tables. You can put them one on top of the other and make a two-tier table like this one. The idea is both interesting and practical. If you want you could find a way to make the two tiers detachable so you can use them separately whenever you want. Of course, apart from the unusual structure, this table also stands out thanks to its eye-catching color block design. {found on akailochiclife}.

Once the mixture is made, simply brush the solution on the wood. It won't immediately turn colors, but over a few hours you'll notice a considerable difference. Check out the photos of my farm table project to see how well it worked using fir boards. You'll notice the fir 2×2's used in this project really took the solution well. The other boards had a little coloring and grain enhancement, but white pine doesn't have many tannins in it so it is less reactive.
Description: This workshop is designed for those who have recently gotten a wood lathe, or have had one for a while, and haven't gotten around to using it until now. During this workshop students get acquainted with the wood lathe and its parts and accessories. We will cover the turning process, as well as sanding and applying finish to a project while it's on the lathe. Students will also be shown a variety of turning tools and how they function. You will also be introduced to wood selection, tool selection, and tool sharpening. Students will test their skills while working on a small turning project. Students should bring suitable eye protection such as safety glasses, goggles, or a face shield. If you have problems with wood dust, a respirator or dust mask would be advisable. Also bring any wood turning tools you might have. Tools and safety gear will be provided for those who don't own them. Materials for turning will be provided.
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A quality wood moisture meter is vital to the long-term success of any woodworking project you put together. Lumber mills try to dry their batches of lumber according to the intended end product destination. That is, if the wood is harvested in the wet Northeast, but is going to be shipped to the arid Southwest, it will be dried more than wood kept in the Northeast for use by woodworkers. The success of your woodworking project, from wood flooring to kitchen cabinets to fine furniture, depends on the correct moisture content levels of the woods you use for your area of the country.
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Training can also offer you the opportunity to specialize in a particular area of this rewarding field, including building maintenance, home renovations, cabinet making, new construction, furniture making, and more. Some programs may even allow you to gain valuable, real-life experience through a paid externship. You'll also learn the latest safety considerations and industry regulations.
It all depends on the program. Some programs are designed for those already working in the construction industry. Other programs are open to anyone, regardless of their background. Some classes have a specific date by which you must have all of your work completed. Others impose no time limits and give you an unlimited timeframe to complete your work.
Certain species of wood have traditionally been associated with different styles of furniture. The wood of choice for the Arts & Crafts movement was quarter sawn white oak, valued for its appearance, durability and dimensional stability. An Arts & Crafts style piece executed in maple might be a well-made example of a classic style, but the choice of wood would be visually at odds with the design. Pine and other softwoods impart a more relaxed, country influence, while traditional hardwoods, such as cherry and walnut, are more likely to be associated with fine furniture.

Along with your materials, there will usually be practical exercises that you can do at home. Illustrated textbooks and study guides, along with instructional videos, will guide you through construction techniques step-by-step. And if you still need additional help, you can always contact your instructor via phone, e-mail, chat or some other method.


If you have some experience working with steel and welding pieces together you’ll find this project a piece of cake. These coffee table plans come from instructables. The base has to be welded and that takes a bit of skill and time and then the top is added. The combination of wood and steel is a pretty harmonious ones. The warmth of the wood combined with the rugged-industrial look of the steel result in a beautiful and well-balanced structure.

Carpenters craft structures and products from wood, steel, fiberglass and other materials. There are different types of carpenters, including residential, industrial and commercial carpenters. Residential carpenters may build new homes or do remodeling work, building structures like walls, stairways, floors, roofs and decks. Commercial carpenters, who may construct schools, malls and hospitals, use many of the same skills, but they may work more with concrete and steel. Industrial carpenters build infrastructure like tunnels, sewers and dams.
2 small Japanese pull saws, a western push saw, fret saw, set of chisels, bit brace with a roll of arbor bits, rabbet plane, side rabbet (trim) plane, 2 shoulder planes, 3 set of diamond stones, slip stone, multiple files, a rasp or two, 2 small bar clamps, a mini vise, hand scrapers, scratch beader with cutters, combination plane with cutters, smoothing plane, jack plane, block plane, combination square, steel straight rule, 12′ tape measure, small bottle of glue, a few short dowels, 2 marking gauges, and a few different marking instruments (awl, pencils, marking knife).

Carpentry students from Loveland schools who go on to become carpenters, construction managers, construction workers, construction engineers, etc. have a good chance at finding employment. For example, there are 743,760 people working as carpenters alone in the US, and their average annual salary is $43,640. Also, Construction laborers make on average $33,190 per year and there are about 856,440 of them employed in the US today. In fact, in the Fort Collins-Loveland area alone, there are 760 employed construction laborers earning an average salary of $29,460. Carpenters in this area earn $39,170/yr and there are 770 employed.
Whether you are a beginner or a DIY professional, if you have a love for the craft of woodworking The Home Depot has got you covered. We have all the essential tools for woodworking that let you hone your craft. Our huge selection of drill presses and miter saws will put the power in your hands to complete your projects faster and easier. And whether you are looking for the strength of a powerful router or the versatility of a lathe, you can find everything you need to help with projects, large and small. If your carpentry plans also include building materials, you don't need to look any further than The Home Depot. From wood and lumber to decking and fencing materials, it's all right here.
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