Description: Every woodturner enjoys the opportunity to give handmade ornaments to friends and family during the holidays, especially one that is made purely out of wood. No pre-made ornament kits or ornament hardware will be used in this class. One might call it au naturel!!!! During this class you will be given the opportunity to see various ornaments that have been turned on the lathe, ranging from small and simple to large and more decorative. Class objectives include, but are not limited to, the following: Wood choice (more common ornament wood species and pros and cons of each) Discussion and demonstration on how ornaments can be colored using a variety of markers, paints, dyes, and gilder's paste. Discuss and demonstrate how a variety of gouges and tools can be used to make ornaments, including texturing tools. Sharpening techniques - the instructor will assist all students when sharpening tools Ornament rough sketch and design, before the wood is on the lathe. Most important, every student in class will be given the opportunity to turn at least one ornament of their own. The instructor will assist with basic sketch and design, and will rotate among all students to assist with cuts, tool use, technique, sharpening, and helpful hints. Experience level: Beginner (some turning experience highly preferred) Suggested tools: Turning tools will be supplied; however, students are encourage to bring their own tools if they have them. 3/8" or 1/2" spindle gouge, narrow parting tool, and small roughing gouge is a great start. Students who wish to bring their own chuck may do so as well (1"-8 tpi, 2" or 50mm dovetail jaws, and pin jaws). Lunch break from 12:00 to 12:45

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These machines are used both in small-scale commercial production of timber products and by hobbyists. Most of these machines may be used on solid timber and on composite products. Machines can be divided into the bigger stationary machines where the machine remains stationary while the material is moved over the machine, and hand-held power tools, where the tool is moved over the material.
Even though this is in fact a side table, we can definitely find inspiration in its design. We find this project to be highly creative and interesting. The table has a hexagon-shaped top and bottom connected by two sets of five rods. Two in each set are longer than the other and go through the bottom hexagon, acting as legs. You can find the plans for this project on ohohblog.
There are three very important elements that must come together in making a project that will not only be pleasing to the eye, but will stand the test of time: good design, careful workmanship and meticulous selection of materials. You can continue to refine your design on paper, but at some point you will have to make that transition from a two dimensional drawing to selecting the lumber to use for each part. This can be one of the most difficult phases of any project and one that has the greatest effect on the final appearance of your finished piece.
This is also a table made from a repurposed pallet. There’s not much you need to change about the pallet, except rearrange a few boards and make the frame smaller. The fact that each board has a slightly different color tone gives the table a special charm. The hairpin legs are a really nice touch. Check out the full tutorial to find out more about how you can build something similar for your own home.
Once the choice of species has been made, the hunt for the perfect boards begins. However, before heading off to the lumber dealer, it is best to do a little preparation. After years of board stalking, I've come up with a kit that I always take with me to the lumberyard. Now, returning to the lumberyard to pick up those 'one or two' extra boards, has become a thing of the past.
Woodworking is an ancient art that requires an artistic eye and precise tools. Whether you're starting off in woodworking or you're an established woodworker, you need good woodworking machinery to help you create your art. A good knowledge of the major machines and how they help you when working with wood can go a mile in making the woodworker’s job easier.
Dan, my work space that is available for power tools is quite small, about 6′ x 20′. It may seem like a lot on the surface, but a long rectangle is a bear to work in. It requires a lot of serpentine action. That said, I don’t have too much room for large footprint tools. I have settled finally on three big tools; a small bench saw, a thickness planer, and a drill press. I had to forgo the jointer, so I use hand tools to make up for it’s absence (as I do with a lot of my hand tool techniques). I have gotten to the point where I can flatten one side and true an edge of a board reasonably quick. I then finish it up with the thickness planer and table saw, giving me a nice flat board. I guess what I am basically saying is, there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and don’t write off hand tools as a quaint way to experience the past. They worked for thousands of years, and still do! Thanks for the blogs, they make for great reading.
I’d like to add some type of sharpening system to your list. A simple sandpaper and slab system, stones, or the more expensive slow grinder system. Although listed, files should be in this sharpening/maintenance category as well. You’ll need these as soon as you purchase a majority of hand tools. They’ll be needed throughout each day of using the tools. Initial setup and routine maintenance will give better results with less fighting the grain and tool. Whether your a beginner or a master, the tools must be sharp and maintained.
It all depends on the program. Some programs are designed for those already working in the construction industry. Other programs are open to anyone, regardless of their background. Some classes have a specific date by which you must have all of your work completed. Others impose no time limits and give you an unlimited timeframe to complete your work.

Hardwoods come from deciduous, or broad-leaved trees, as opposed to softwoods, that are harvested from from evergreens. In general, the lumber derived from hardwood species are typically harder than softwoods, although there are exceptions (balsa wood is very light and soft, but is considered a hardwood). Most hardwood tree species lose their leaves in winter, and generally offer a much wider variety of colors and textures than softwoods. Typically, stock from hardwood species are a lot more expensive than those from softwoods.
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There are three very important elements that must come together in making a project that will not only be pleasing to the eye, but will stand the test of time: good design, careful workmanship and meticulous selection of materials. You can continue to refine your design on paper, but at some point you will have to make that transition from a two dimensional drawing to selecting the lumber to use for each part. This can be one of the most difficult phases of any project and one that has the greatest effect on the final appearance of your finished piece.
Additionally, after becoming a journey level carpenter, you can go on to obtain master certification, which typically requires multiple years of consecutive experience as a journeyworker. This can help you earn a higher wage or qualify for teaching or management roles. You can even take on your own apprentices, allowing you to share your expertise with the next generation of professionals.
If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.
This is also a table made from a repurposed pallet. There’s not much you need to change about the pallet, except rearrange a few boards and make the frame smaller. The fact that each board has a slightly different color tone gives the table a special charm. The hairpin legs are a really nice touch. Check out the full tutorial to find out more about how you can build something similar for your own home.
About forty years ago I purchased a Shopsmith Mark V because I lacked space for a large shop, and also moved around the United States a lot. Later I purchased another Shopsmith Mark V Model 510 for the increase in table size and flexibility. I do wood working as a hobby, not to do many projects as fast as possible. I also have every tool and accessory that Shopsmith makes for the two primary tools. Their quality is excellent, and while I enjoy antique tools like the 1912 three phase electric Camel Back Drill Press I purchased for my son’s shop, the Shopsmith does every thing I have ever needed.
Rip your 1x4's so they are 3" wide. This should make them nice and square, so they fit together without any gaps or rounded edges. Drill pocket holes in both ends of each board. Drill several pocket holes (3 or 4) on the edges of each board. Spread wood glue on the edges of each board, and sandwich them together, using bar clamps to keep them tight. Using 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the 1x4's together. (see photo on next step)

Loveland lies in Larimer county, which is one of the 55 counties in Colorado. Overall, the Fort Collins-Loveland area has 128,650 total employed workers according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, with a 2% unemployment rate, $21/hr average worker wage, and a $43,210 average annual salary. Thus, about 6 out of every 1000 jobs in Loveland are held by carpenters, and 6/1000 are held by construction laborers.
Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it’s inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain very well, so it’s best to use it only when you intend to paint the finished product. Douglas fir is moderately strong and hard for a softwood, rating 4 on a scale of 1 to 4.
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