Dan, my work space that is available for power tools is quite small, about 6′ x 20′. It may seem like a lot on the surface, but a long rectangle is a bear to work in. It requires a lot of serpentine action. That said, I don’t have too much room for large footprint tools. I have settled finally on three big tools; a small bench saw, a thickness planer, and a drill press. I had to forgo the jointer, so I use hand tools to make up for it’s absence (as I do with a lot of my hand tool techniques). I have gotten to the point where I can flatten one side and true an edge of a board reasonably quick. I then finish it up with the thickness planer and table saw, giving me a nice flat board. I guess what I am basically saying is, there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and don’t write off hand tools as a quaint way to experience the past. They worked for thousands of years, and still do! Thanks for the blogs, they make for great reading.
If you`ve found the coffee table plans below interesting we invite you to check various other free woodworking plans, we have curated lists that will show you how to build a chicken coop, playhouse, rabbit hutch, pole barn, small cabin, greenhouse, porch swing, fire pit, garage, cat tower, a rocket stove, tiny house, duck house, deer stand, bat house, diy tree house, cat tower, porch swing, farmhouse table, pole barn, rabbit hutch, diy dog bed, a coffee table or a gazebo.
Aside from pallets, lots of other things can also be repurposed into components for a DIY coffee table. For example, this one has a tile top. The frame is made of wood and can be crafted in no time. In fact, you can use some leftover wood pieces and if you also have an extra tile from previous renovations this can prove to be a cheap coffee table which you can build with things you already own.

With Penn Foster Career School, you can learn how to become a carpenter at home at a pace that’s right for you. This carpentry training program also includes tools and learning aids, such as an architect scale, construction print set, and instructional videos. When you graduate, you'll receive two reference textbooks: Finish Carpentry and Smart Business for Contractors.


This woodworking plans project is a Bentwood Coffee Table that is a challenging design for those who would like to try a project which requires wood bending. The contemporary lines combined with traditional natural wood allow this table to fit comforatbly with many other styles of furnishings. The technique for bending the wood does not require any special tools or steaming processes.

My $0.02 worth. I agree with the thickness planer [mine is 10″] but anything over a 6″ jointer is expensive and space-consuming, so use hand planes as in your later blog. I inherited an 8″ table saw that my dad and I used to build a 12′ outboard boat back in 1955. I’ve used it for ripping, but I’m having second thoughts because of safety issues. Some have suggested a band saw for ripping, which is quieter and safer to use. I gave my router away [and hope to get rid of my Freud biscuit joiner and 6″ jointer]. A quality eggbeater drill works every bit [pun not intended] as well as a power drill, and they cost less. A coping saw and a jewelers saw negate the need for a jigsaw unless you are into making puzzles. Chris Schwarz has a video short on one of the Highland Woodworker series showing how to joint the edge of a board with a plane and a simple jig on the workbench surface. Another reason to bypass the jointer.


More than a decade ago I spent 2 weeks in Maine aspiring to learn furniture making. On my return home I started enthusiastically planning to turn my basement into a proper shop – with all the “essential” tools I had learned to use. My list reflected my engineer’s preference for buying quality and quickly exceeded $25k in power tools alone (table saw, band saw, joiner, thickness planer, drill press…) even before solving the power, lighting and dust challenges.

I want to make some wooden boxes and cases, and I haven't done any wood work till now so I don't have any tools and I can't buy the workshop electronic machines which I see in almost every woodworking instructables here (such as drill, lathe, sanding, saw, mitre, buiskit jointer, and all other electronic tools). So I want to begin with simple hand tools.
I’ve gained a lot more confidence in my woodworking capabilities over the last year, so I wanted to tackle this project solo (a.k.a. without the assistance or supervision of Jeremy), and I was actually really surprised at how easy and fast this table came together. I was able to shop for my supplies, make my cuts, and build the table all within just a few hours. Not bad for a little afternoon project!

Dan, my work space that is available for power tools is quite small, about 6′ x 20′. It may seem like a lot on the surface, but a long rectangle is a bear to work in. It requires a lot of serpentine action. That said, I don’t have too much room for large footprint tools. I have settled finally on three big tools; a small bench saw, a thickness planer, and a drill press. I had to forgo the jointer, so I use hand tools to make up for it’s absence (as I do with a lot of my hand tool techniques). I have gotten to the point where I can flatten one side and true an edge of a board reasonably quick. I then finish it up with the thickness planer and table saw, giving me a nice flat board. I guess what I am basically saying is, there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and don’t write off hand tools as a quaint way to experience the past. They worked for thousands of years, and still do! Thanks for the blogs, they make for great reading.


Now, I know this list only contains traditional hand tools, but my circumstances led me to this choice to complete the job. After all, he is my brother and he’s helped me once or twice. Not all woodworkers will want to take the time and effort to go strictly with hand tools. That’s fine; different circumstances and preferences will lead the way. Most people wouldn’t drive a scooter full of tools to assist their siblings either. Sounds crazy, but I enjoyed the trip through the mountains. Once I was there, I still needed a way to rip through lumber. I also needed a can of finish. As needed, a few jigs and templates were constructed from the purchased lumber.
You might be able to enroll in a General Contractor's License Preparation Certificate, a Carpentry Diploma or a Career Diploma in Carpentry program, among other options. Programs might require a high school diploma or its equivalent and a placement test. The programs may prepare you for entry-level positions in industry, engineering and the construction trades. The following topics might be covered in a carpentry or contracting program:
Chic white coffee table with blag legs and with amazing natural garden like spell! This happens due to built-in planter that make you feel like you are sitting in a garden while being around this coffee table! Grow your favorite flowers or herbs in the integrated planter or simply use it as an ice box for your beverage parties! Want to copy this versatile table design now? Step-by-step DIY tutorial here abeautifulmess
Industrial carpenters work on civil engineering projects and in industrial settings, where they build scaffolding and create and set forms for pouring concrete. Some industrial carpenters build tunnel bracing or partitions in underground passageways and mines to control the circulation of air to worksites. Others build concrete forms for tunnels, bridges, dams, power plants, and sewers.
The most common type of cedar is the western red variety. Western red cedar, as its name implies, has a reddish color to it. This type of wood is relatively soft (1 on a scale of 1 to 4), has a straight grain, and has a slightly aromatic smell. Western Red cedar is mostly used for outdoor projects such as furniture, decks, and building exteriors because it can handle moist environments without rotting. Western red cedar is moderately priced and can be found at most home centers.
Typically, a carpentry training program will cover the following subjects: algebra; geometry; physics; hand tool selection, care, and use; architectural drawing; blueprint reading; machine woodworking; identification and measurement of materials; project management and estimating; principles and procedures in residential construction; building code requirements; framing and finishing; building technology; roofing systems; interior and exterior finishing; door and window layout and construction; and mechanical systems.
Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work.
Mark the table up with various tools to give the table character. I like to use a hammer and a small bit to punch holes in the top that resemble worm holes (see Episode 3 -Part 2 video). You can also run a circular saw blade across to give it individual saw marks (without it being plugged in). Hammers, scraping tools, bolts, pipe wrenches, crow bars, and other tools can be used to mark up the table and give it a unique look. Make sure to keep marks random so they look natural and don't overdo the distressing!

If you have some experience working with steel and welding pieces together you’ll find this project a piece of cake. These coffee table plans come from instructables. The base has to be welded and that takes a bit of skill and time and then the top is added. The combination of wood and steel is a pretty harmonious ones. The warmth of the wood combined with the rugged-industrial look of the steel result in a beautiful and well-balanced structure.
The Delta 22-555 Portable Thickness Planer is great The Delta 22-555 Portable Thickness Planer is great for professional results in the woodworker's shop. It features two polyurethane feed rollers for a no-slip grip on the work piece; positioned close to the cutter head to improve work piece finish. The machine also has precision machined steel cutter head for ...  More + Product Details Close
Introductory carpentry classes provide students with an overview of the methods and technologies used in residential and light commercial carpentry and are typically taken at the beginning of a carpentry program. Hands-on experience and lectures make up the class content, which can cover building codes, site layout, estimating, interior and exterior finishes, framing and cabinetry. Additional subjects of instruction may include footing and foundation forming, concrete specifications, OSHA/WISHA construction safety standards and basic carpentry math.

This course introduces students to remodeling practices and demolitions. Students learn how to plan a remodeling project, complete basic plumbing and electrical jobs, apply for permits, match finished materials and estimate costs. Instruction in reading architectural blueprints for residential remodels is generally included, and students become familiar with specifications, codes and construction drawings. Some residential remodeling courses provide hands-on learning experience by requiring group or individual remodeling projects. This course is usually taken after basic carpentry courses. 

Wow, what a great problem to have Boris! If you can send some photos I’ll look at them. But unseen, I’d ask them to try to get some quartersawn boards out, and also some full width flatsawn boards. It just depends on how much wood you’ll get if you quartersaw it. It also depends on what you think you’ll build down the road. Some furniture pieces don’t need to be quite as stable as others. Good luck!
I love this & your videos. It’s really helped my confidence level (as a total beginner.) I’ve built your floating shelves (LOVE them) and the cake stand you did (I’m adding dowels in the middle for the connecting parts so I can take it apart & store it almost flat & not worry about Velcro) I’m wondering if you’d do a console that matches this? I really like Ana White’s x console but liked your legs better!
I’m currently working on a dining room table with this color in mind (I also plan on a coffee table soon). I’ve been testing out stain colors and dark walnut is currently in the lead. I love the way this coffee table turned out in color. How many coats of stain did you use? Also, did the dark wax make a big difference in color? I was planning on using a satin poly for sealant (mostly because it’s what is most convenient and what I’m accustomed to), but I’m interested in the dark wax after seeing this post. Any recommendations you have are much appreciated.

I love this & your videos. It’s really helped my confidence level (as a total beginner.) I’ve built your floating shelves (LOVE them) and the cake stand you did (I’m adding dowels in the middle for the connecting parts so I can take it apart & store it almost flat & not worry about Velcro) I’m wondering if you’d do a console that matches this? I really like Ana White’s x console but liked your legs better!
The next hand tool every woodworker should have is a nail set. In fact, you should have several sizes. They look like awls, and you use them to drive nail heads into the wood so they are flush or right below the surface. This allows you to fill the holes and prepare for staining or painting. The nail setter will usually have either a convex or concave surface to grip the nail better and keep it from sliding off and marring the wood.
This is also a table made from a repurposed pallet. There’s not much you need to change about the pallet, except rearrange a few boards and make the frame smaller. The fact that each board has a slightly different color tone gives the table a special charm. The hairpin legs are a really nice touch. Check out the full tutorial to find out more about how you can build something similar for your own home.

I’ve been wanting an excuse to buy a Kreg Jig for probably a year now, and with a long DIY to-do list of building tables, benches, and more for our living and dining room, I decided now was a good time to make the purchase. This project is in no way sponsored by Kreg Jig, but I was so impressed with how much easier this tool made my life, I just had to share it with you guys! This tutorial (and probably most builds from here on out) will be shown using the Kreg Jig, so if you enjoy building things for your home, I highly recommend getting yourself one! You can purchase the kit I have here: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System.

×