Just a little nitpick on the tape measure blurb. The hook should not be completely tight. It should move in and out about a 1/16th or the thickness of the hook. This way you get an accurate measurement whether you hook a part to measure or bump up to it. If you want more accurate measurements with a tape measure, “burn” an inch instead of hooking or bumping the part. Just line up what you want to measure with the 1″ mark and subtract that inch from the final measurement.
Using wood glue and 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the frame you just built (19" x 11") to the 4x4 frame posts. You will use the pocket holes you drilled in the 19" boards. The frame will sit on the edge of the grooves, not inside. See plans for details. The frame should sit flush with the tops of your 4x4's. This will make the bottom 4" off the ground.
The Amish here in Ohio use a nifty wooden rule for calculating bd. ft. It has a brass football shaped hook on the end and they’re about 2′ long. Three columns of numbers run down the length of stick. These columns are the length of stock say, 12,14,16 foot. Within these columns, bd. ft. has already been calculated and marked. For a 16′ bd. the hook is placed over one edge and a reading of bd. ft. is taken from opposite edge from the 16′ column. “Audels Carpenters and Builders Guide #1” pg. 146, shows a good example. They call… Read more »
Concrete has been deliberated a building material for a pretty long time and not a finishing choice. On the other hand, with the style taking like industrial and attaining territory concrete tables are pretty in and chic in these days. The best and fundamental feature of a concrete table is the skill to create one yourself easily by the following a few easy steps.
Suppose you you were in possession of, as I am, four Cherry logs ranging in size from 18″ to 24″ diameter by 12′ to 16′ in length and you need to instruct the sawmill how they are to be cut. Also suppose that you are a novice woodworker who intends to use the resulting lumber in undetermined woodworking projects. How would you instruct the mill to cut up the logs?
Wow, what a great problem to have Boris! If you can send some photos I’ll look at them. But unseen, I’d ask them to try to get some quartersawn boards out, and also some full width flatsawn boards. It just depends on how much wood you’ll get if you quartersaw it. It also depends on what you think you’ll build down the road. Some furniture pieces don’t need to be quite as stable as others. Good luck!
Like wooden pallets, the coffee table wine crates are a delightful resource for creating a table from scratch. All that is compulsory in four crates and wheels set if needed. Utilize the central space occasioned from the rates merging to show your beautiful flower vase or candle holder. Therefore, wine crate coffee table is a good woodworking project.
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Chic white coffee table with blag legs and with amazing natural garden like spell! This happens due to built-in planter that make you feel like you are sitting in a garden while being around this coffee table! Grow your favorite flowers or herbs in the integrated planter or simply use it as an ice box for your beverage parties! Want to copy this versatile table design now? Step-by-step DIY tutorial here abeautifulmess
More than a year ago, before I joined the staff, Megan Fitzpatrick and I talked about an article I wanted to write about lumberyards and the perennial discussion about domestic versus exotic lumber. At the time, I was also working on an interactive map of New York City’s neighborhoods, and I floated the idea of creating a map of local lumberyards that would accompany the article.
A planer comes into use when the woodworker intends to have flat boards of even thickness. Contemporary machines may have a planning platform that helps achieve accurate thickness more quickly. The woodworker adjusts the platform to set the cutting depth, then feeds the board through the machine. The in-feed roller carries the wood forward as it gets placed under the blades of the cutter drum before being moved out of the machine by the out-feed roller. Some planers have both manual and electronic controls.
About forty years ago I purchased a Shopsmith Mark V because I lacked space for a large shop, and also moved around the United States a lot. Later I purchased another Shopsmith Mark V Model 510 for the increase in table size and flexibility. I do wood working as a hobby, not to do many projects as fast as possible. I also have every tool and accessory that Shopsmith makes for the two primary tools. Their quality is excellent, and while I enjoy antique tools like the 1912 three phase electric Camel Back Drill Press I purchased for my son’s shop, the Shopsmith does every thing I have ever needed.

If you have some experience working with steel and welding pieces together you’ll find this project a piece of cake. These coffee table plans come from instructables. The base has to be welded and that takes a bit of skill and time and then the top is added. The combination of wood and steel is a pretty harmonious ones. The warmth of the wood combined with the rugged-industrial look of the steel result in a beautiful and well-balanced structure.
Delta 22-590 13 in. portable thickness planer includes: Delta 22-590 13 in. portable thickness planer includes: 3 cutting knives cutter head wrench dust chute with 4 in. port and magnetic blade changing tool. High-speed steel indexed double-sided knives provides 2X blade life and allows for quick blade changes. Oversized cutter head height adjustment handle with indexing ring provides ...  More + Product Details Close
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Rip your 1x4's so they are 3" wide. This should make them nice and square, so they fit together without any gaps or rounded edges. Drill pocket holes in both ends of each board. Drill several pocket holes (3 or 4) on the edges of each board. Spread wood glue on the edges of each board, and sandwich them together, using bar clamps to keep them tight. Using 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the 1x4's together. (see photo on next step)
Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.
Moving on to the top of the table. This will be assembled identical to the first shelf assembly, but the depth of the plywood will change. Grab a coupld scraps of the barnwood or planks you are going to use on the top. Lay them flat on a table, and lay the plywood on top of them with the pocket holes facing up. Now attach the long boards first using glue and 1.25” pocket hole screws. After those are attached, you can attach the shorter ends. These will attach with both 3/4 and 2.5” pocket hole screws.
Students learn the basics of residential house framing, including layout techniques, roof and wall framing, planning for windows and doors and the pouring of a foundation. Following classroom instruction in basic carpentry math and materials estimation, students have the opportunity to employ their carpentry skills by working together on a residential building project. Teamwork, workplace ethics, craftsmanship and punctuality are emphasized in the practical portion of the course.
For over 50 years, American Lumber has earned its reputation for quality, service and dedication to innovation in the hardwood lumber industry. We combine years of hardwood lumber and hardwood log experience with technology and resources to help our customers succeed. Today we provide almost all of the North American hardwood lumber species including red and white oak, ash, cherry, poplar, maple, hickory, alder and walnut. However, we are not just American anymore! We are also a premier provider of imported hardwood lumber from South America, Africa, and Asia...Read More
The last step is to dry brush over top of the white washed surface. Using a dry brush, I used the same linen white chalk paint from Rust-Oleum and dipped the tip of the brush into the paint. Getting just a little paint on the end of the brush, I then dabbed the brush onto a piece of scrap wood to take off any excess paint. Then, going with the grain of the wood, I used quick strokes. You can add more or less depending on the look you desire!
The topic of lumber confused me mainly because I couldn’t find a simple summary of the topic. I found a lot of complex discussions with different terms used by different “experts”. I am by no stretch of the imagination a lumber expert, but I’m very good at simplifying complex topics so that everyone can understand. As a result, this is a simple practical guide to help you understand how wood moves, what wood to buy, how to buy it, and where to buy it.
One subject that a woodworker must always consider when building a project is how seasonal moisture and temperature fluctuations will cause expansion and contraction of the wood stock in the assembled project. For instance, if you've ever experienced a drawer that sticks only in the winter time, you've experienced seasonal movement of wood. Since each wood species is affected by these temperature and moisture fluctuations, you'll need to know a bit about the climate where the project will be used, and how your chosen wood stock is affected by the climate changes. Again, your local woodworking supplier can be a great resource for answering these types of questions in your area.
Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it’s inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain very well, so it’s best to use it only when you intend to paint the finished product. Douglas fir is moderately strong and hard for a softwood, rating 4 on a scale of 1 to 4.
Now it’s time to attach the top of the table. Line up the 1×6 boards and place the frame you built upside down and centered on the boards. Drill 1 1/4″ screws through the supports into each board to secure them to the table. I used regular wood screws for this step originally, but the heads were sinking into the supports and not pulling the top boards down tight like I wanted. So I swapped them out for the Kreg Jig screws, which have washer heads, and they worked like a charm. If you’re having trouble getting those top boards secured tight, I’d try switching to the Kreg Jig screws!

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Residential carpenters specialize in building and remodeling family homes, townhomes, and condominiums. As part of a single job, they might create and set forms for footings, walls, and slabs, and frame and finish exterior walls, roofs, and decks. Additionally, residential carpenters frame interior walls, build stairs, and install drywall, crown molding, doors, and cabinets. They may also tile floors and lay wood floors and carpet.
The final building step is to lay each plank in place. These will be cut to 20” long each. Attach each piece using wood glue and brad nails. Just make sure the length the nails isn’t longer than the width of the planks and plywood combined. Once you have finished that, you can paint or stain and add your hardware!  Because I was using pre-finished white barn wood from Porter Barn Wood, I painted the table before adding the planks.  Check out these planks….
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