A Guide to Honing and Sharpening helps woodworkers keep their tools in the best possible working condition. It focuses on the history of honing and sharpening and vital aspects of these practices, such as stropping, beveling, chiseling, flattening and other modern technological methods. Students can explore these methods via text, pictures and diagrams.
Description: Every woodturner enjoys the opportunity to give handmade ornaments to friends and family during the holidays, especially one that is made purely out of wood. No pre-made ornament kits or ornament hardware will be used in this class. One might call it au naturel!!!! During this class you will be given the opportunity to see various ornaments that have been turned on the lathe, ranging from small and simple to large and more decorative. Class objectives include, but are not limited to, the following: Wood choice (more common ornament wood species and pros and cons of each) Discussion and demonstration on how ornaments can be colored using a variety of markers, paints, dyes, and gilder's paste. Discuss and demonstrate how a variety of gouges and tools can be used to make ornaments, including texturing tools. Sharpening techniques - the instructor will assist all students when sharpening tools Ornament rough sketch and design, before the wood is on the lathe. Most important, every student in class will be given the opportunity to turn at least one ornament of their own. The instructor will assist with basic sketch and design, and will rotate among all students to assist with cuts, tool use, technique, sharpening, and helpful hints. Experience level: Beginner (some turning experience highly preferred) Suggested tools: Turning tools will be supplied; however, students are encourage to bring their own tools if they have them. 3/8" or 1/2" spindle gouge, narrow parting tool, and small roughing gouge is a great start. Students who wish to bring their own chuck may do so as well (1"-8 tpi, 2" or 50mm dovetail jaws, and pin jaws). Lunch break from 12:00 to 12:45
Thread Related Link and Image Guidelines Thread Related Links posted at WOODWEB's Forums and Exchanges should point to locations that provide supporting information for the topic being discussed in the current message thread. The purpose of WOODWEB Forums is to provide answers, not to serve as an advertising venue. A Thread Related Link that directs visitors to an area with inappropriate content will be removed. WOODWEB reserves the right to delete any messages with links or images it deems inappropriate. (return to form)
I work with a lot of rough sawn boards (Wood Mizer) that are up to 12 inches wide. The worse defect is twist. First I saw the stock to rough project lengths and then using winding sticks, I attack the twist with a #5 hand plane, gradually moving the winding sticks toward the center. If there is bow or cup I can plane that out also. I now have a reference surface that can go thru my planer. The finished boards are perfect. This is not really difficult or excessively time consuming.
The field of carpentry offers many opportunities for employment and advancement for workers with solid educational backgrounds and training. As work and educational experiences enhance your skill sets, you may earn the chance to advance to more responsibility and a higher salary. For example, you could be promoted to a general construction supervisor position within a larger construction company.
The article is coming soon to the magazine, and I’m happy to say that the map is here. Months ago, I put out a call over social media for readers to submit their favorite local lumberyards, with a short review or blurb about what they like about their yard – I called it “The Great Lumberyard Census.” After hours of sorting through the entries, formatting them for the digital interactive map and playing with GIS software, the map and accompanying directory is finished.
Remember the coffee table made of crates that we showed you a while back? Here’s another one. This time the design is quite different. The crates are integrated into a frame and there’s also a table top which offers a smooth and uniform surface. the crates have handles and can be taken out and used as storage boxes for all sorts of things. The plans shared on hertoolbelt also show how to turn individual crates into cute little stools and ottomans.
As someone who is just progressing past being a “beginner” (just getting into building furniture) in the woodworking community, I would say there are a number of changes I would make to your list. First, I would say that a power jointer/thicknesser does not belong on the list by any means. They are way too large of an investment and take up a lot of space (not to mention you can buy your stock at the desired dimensions). I also strongly disagree with the concept of joinery devices. As someone new to the trade, I feel this is a very important skill that must be developed, not skipped over by buying devices power devices that achieve a single goal. I think the jigsaw should be replaced by a good bandsaw. I just purchased my first major power tool and it was a 14″ bandsaw and not a tablesaw for space reasons as well as versatility. The bandsaw allows me to resaw, cut curves, (now that it is adjusted for drift) rip pieces of stock accurately that are thicker than a table saw could handle, etc. Once the cut is complete, a handplane can remove any saw marks and square/flatten a surface. It is also really useful for cutting tenons and dovetails. Handsaws can be used for crosscutting and anything else the bandsaw cannot handle. As for a bench, if you are getting into woodworking, this should be your first real project (and it is not expensive to make). You are also missing a good vise to be attached to the bench.
There are three very important elements that must come together in making a project that will not only be pleasing to the eye, but will stand the test of time: good design, careful workmanship and meticulous selection of materials. You can continue to refine your design on paper, but at some point you will have to make that transition from a two dimensional drawing to selecting the lumber to use for each part. This can be one of the most difficult phases of any project and one that has the greatest effect on the final appearance of your finished piece.
If you have some experience working with steel and welding pieces together you’ll find this project a piece of cake. These coffee table plans come from instructables. The base has to be welded and that takes a bit of skill and time and then the top is added. The combination of wood and steel is a pretty harmonious ones. The warmth of the wood combined with the rugged-industrial look of the steel result in a beautiful and well-balanced structure.
Screwdrivers are another must-have in the woodworker’s set of hand tools. Not only will you need Phillips and slot, or flathead screwdrivers, you’ll need star drivers and Torx drivers, too. A quality construction is vital to a good set of screwdrivers. So many of them are made out of soft metal, and the first time you put any “oomph” behind them, they strip out, becoming absolutely useless.
If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.
For furniture making, the best, most stable stock has the annual growth rings intersecting each face at approximately the same angle, roughly 45º. Wood cut this way is referred to as quarter sawn. Milling quarter sawn lumber is a labour intensive process, which is why it costs more than plain-sawn lumber. The appearance of the grain will tend to be similar on all four sides. This makes quarter sawn lumber a great choice for table legs, rails and stiles of frame and panel doors, or for any part where two adjacent sides are visible.
There are numerous coffee table woodworking projects in the market. In case you are willing to design a coffee table for your den, living room or family room, there are some amazing coffee table woodworking projects to keep in mind. One can choose different types of such designs, which add to the beauty, look and design of a room. Mostly people prefer the designs that are eye catchy as well as unique. So let’s dig in to check out some really amazing coffee table woodworking projects.

“Basic,” on the other hand, is a word that allows for growth – and that’s exactly what you want in your woodworking tool kit. You want to be able to take the same kit with you through many years in the craft. With my basic woodworking tools list, I wanted to provide a core set of tools that will serve you well from project to project. I’m especially concerned these days with the transition to hardwood furniture making, as opposed to plywood boxes of various sizes. That’s the transition I’m making right now in my own work!
×