Like with most live-edge tables, the hardest part of this project shared on instructables is finding the right slab of wood. It has to have a suitable shape and size for a coffee table top and to look interesting. Cracks, knots and other imperfections help to give it character. Once you have the slab, clean it and apply a protective finish, after which install the legs.
Teak is becoming rarer as the days go on, but it is the staple for fine outdoor furniture. Teak is highly weather-resistant and beautiful (not to mention expensive — can you believe almost $24 a board foot?). Teak has an oily feel and a golden-brown color. It rates a 3 on a scale of 1 to 5 for hardness and is only available from larger lumberyards and specialty suppliers.
Treeline offers only the finest wood carving tools and supplies. Everything from Treeline is backed by our 30-day guarantee against any defects. We have been providing wood carving tools since 1997 and we strive to excel in customer service and quality products. All employees at Treeline are very knowledgeable and professional, so if you are looking for the right woodcarving tools, contact us and we will do our best to help you.
If you'd like to learn more about the differences between hardwood species, I can think of no better resource than R. Bruce Hoadley's 1980 masterpiece, Understanding Wood: A Craftsman's Guide to Wood Technology. Not only does Hoadley detail nearly every species used for woodworking, he does an exceptional job at describing how to prepare, work with and finish these hardwoods. This is an industry-standard resource, one that I'd highly recommend to every woodworker.
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Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.


If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.
Hey Great Article,Thanks. 4 months ago, I started looking for woodworking.The industry is extremely interesting,but I have problems with how I can do it.My uncle who has been doing more than me in this industry,has suggested to me to follow Teds plans.Do you think it’s a good move to follow these plans??I keep reading good reviews about Teds plans but I am unsure if it will still work on me.At this time I can purchase these plans at a very low price,so if possible can you leave me feedback on wether I should do it or not. It would mean a lot coming from an expert in this field.
I built my coffee table!! I used the plans at www. EasyWoodwork.org to build mine – highly recommended you check those out too. They are detailed and super easy to read and understand unlike several others I found online. The amount of plans there is mind-boggling… there’s like 16,000 plans or something like that for tons of different projects. Definitely enough to keep me busy with projects for many more years to come haha

Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it’s inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain very well, so it’s best to use it only when you intend to paint the finished product. Douglas fir is moderately strong and hard for a softwood, rating 4 on a scale of 1 to 4.
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