Being without machinery to dimension and dress rough timber myself I can definitely see the benefit, but I think the investment (both in money and space) in machinery like this is premature for ‘basic’ woodworking. Additionally, without some other machinery (table saw, bandsaw) you’re still going to have trouble dimensioning smaller timber for projects from large/rough stock (e.g. producing timber strips for case fronts, ripping to reduce thickness, etc).
You’ll need a long screwdriver with a square blade that is very heavy duty. This gives you a lot of torque. You’ll also need a small and medium slot screwdriver. For working on cabinets or tight places in woodworking, you’ll need a screwdriver with a thin shank so that you can reach screws that are inside of deep holes. This is accomplished with a cabinet screwdriver. Get a couple of medium Phillips head screwdrivers, and a stubby one too, for those tight places. You may also want a ratcheting screwdriver.
The campaign features a new customer-focused website, new advertising centered on visually-appealing wood applications, and the launch of Northwest Hardwoods’ Pinterest and Instagram accounts to convey visual ideas and aspirations for the many uses of hardwoods. The campaign offers an opportunity for Northwest Hardwoods to reach out to new audiences including designers, specifiers, architects and OEMs, underscoring the fact that no other building and design material is as visually appealing and as sustainable as timber. Additionally, the campaign includes the creation of product specific communications outreach that will support the company’s sales objectives.
Thank you so much, Fawn!! I think using pocket holes to connect the top boards is a fantastic idea, and we actually did that with the bigger dining room table we did a few weeks ago. For our coffee table, I kind of liked the look of small gaps in between each board… gives it a more rustic look I think! 🙂 Have fun building your table… I’d love to see it! Tag me on Instagram!
A planer comes into use when the woodworker intends to have flat boards of even thickness. Contemporary machines may have a planning platform that helps achieve accurate thickness more quickly. The woodworker adjusts the platform to set the cutting depth, then feeds the board through the machine. The in-feed roller carries the wood forward as it gets placed under the blades of the cutter drum before being moved out of the machine by the out-feed roller. Some planers have both manual and electronic controls.
The final building step is to lay each plank in place. These will be cut to 20” long each. Attach each piece using wood glue and brad nails. Just make sure the length the nails isn’t longer than the width of the planks and plywood combined. Once you have finished that, you can paint or stain and add your hardware!  Because I was using pre-finished white barn wood from Porter Barn Wood, I painted the table before adding the planks.  Check out these planks….
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