This small coffee table is ideal for a side table or end table. The table is designed with the home handyman in mind. It is both easy to build and is very sturdy. The minimum tools required to construct this coffee table are... Pencil; square; measuring tape; handsaw; hammer; chisel; a couple of clamps and lots of sandpaper. Most handymen are likely to have those tools in their arsenal. Of course... it would make life easier if you also happened to have a drop-saw and a belt sander. The wood used for this coffee table was 90mm x 45mm (1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches) dressed/surfaced cedar. Cedar is reddish in color, light and easy to work with. Other wood can be used. Virtually any wood can be used for this project, just allow for different widths and thicknesses, and also take into account, the finish. Is the table to be painted, stained and/or coated with polyurethane? Obviously, if the table is to be painted, then an inferior and less expensive wood can be used, as imperfections (within reason) can be filled and painted over.
The Wood Handbook seeks to familiarize students with wood as it is used in engineering and other industries through a PDF format. It covers topics in woodworking, such as the characteristics, availability, structure, function, stress, moisture relation and physical properties of wood. It also looks at fastenings, structural analysis, adhesives, bonds, finishing, drying, sterilization and fire safety methods. The 20-chapter book uses pictures, diagrams, graphs and tables to display various kinds of content for learners.
The Amish here in Ohio use a nifty wooden rule for calculating bd. ft. It has a brass football shaped hook on the end and they’re about 2′ long. Three columns of numbers run down the length of stick. These columns are the length of stock say, 12,14,16 foot. Within these columns, bd. ft. has already been calculated and marked. For a 16′ bd. the hook is placed over one edge and a reading of bd. ft. is taken from opposite edge from the 16′ column. “Audels Carpenters and Builders Guide #1” pg. 146, shows a good example. They call… Read more »
Poplar is one of the less expensive hardwoods. It’s also fairly soft (1 in hardness on a scale of 1 to 5), which makes it easy to work with. Poplar is white with some green or brown streaks in the heartwood. Because poplar is not the most beautiful wood, it’s rarely used in fine furniture, and if it is, it’s almost always painted. Poplar can be a good choice for drawers (where it won’t be seen) because it is stable and inexpensive. You can find poplar at larger home centers, but a lumberyard will have a better selection.
About forty years ago I purchased a Shopsmith Mark V because I lacked space for a large shop, and also moved around the United States a lot. Later I purchased another Shopsmith Mark V Model 510 for the increase in table size and flexibility. I do wood working as a hobby, not to do many projects as fast as possible. I also have every tool and accessory that Shopsmith makes for the two primary tools. Their quality is excellent, and while I enjoy antique tools like the 1912 three phase electric Camel Back Drill Press I purchased for my son’s shop, the Shopsmith does every thing I have ever needed.
To cut a 60 degree angle safely I built a jig. I simply nailed 1×4 boards together in a triangle shape. The back 1×4 rests flat on the miter saw fence. You can use the side that runs straight towards you as your new fence. Set the 2×2 board against the fence and slide it into place. Cut the angle at 30 degrees on your miter saw (it will actually cut it at 60 degrees because of your jig.
Wood tends to rise its general quality and character with the time passage. I would like to say that water wind rain snow possibly transform its porosity and texture and make it more attractive for a table piece. The attractiveness of this coffee table is the reason behind its mostly utilization. So, you can keep in mind this table as an excellent table.
Just a little nitpick on the tape measure blurb. The hook should not be completely tight. It should move in and out about a 1/16th or the thickness of the hook. This way you get an accurate measurement whether you hook a part to measure or bump up to it. If you want more accurate measurements with a tape measure, “burn” an inch instead of hooking or bumping the part. Just line up what you want to measure with the 1″ mark and subtract that inch from the final measurement.
An assortment of chisels should be part of every workbench. Chisels are not just for wood carvers. Any woodworker will need chisels to clean out joints and saw cuts. Look for chisels made of high-alloy carbon steel or chromium-vanadium alloyed steel. Hardwood grips are best, especially if they have metal caps on them. This will keep the end of the handle from becoming malformed when you hammer on it.
Rip your 1x4's so they are 3" wide. This should make them nice and square, so they fit together without any gaps or rounded edges. Drill pocket holes in both ends of each board. Drill several pocket holes (3 or 4) on the edges of each board. Spread wood glue on the edges of each board, and sandwich them together, using bar clamps to keep them tight. Using 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the 1x4's together. (see photo on next step)

At the core of the campaign is a new website, which immerses customers in a user-friendly, easy-to-navigate, and informative user experience. Site visitors will find new photography and video, product-specific pages featuring detailed descriptions, a timeline recounting the company’s history, sales maps, and a monthly blog. Built with the future in mind, the site’s foundation allows for the eventual expansion to include real-time inventory tracking, sample requests, and more.


I love this & your videos. It’s really helped my confidence level (as a total beginner.) I’ve built your floating shelves (LOVE them) and the cake stand you did (I’m adding dowels in the middle for the connecting parts so I can take it apart & store it almost flat & not worry about Velcro) I’m wondering if you’d do a console that matches this? I really like Ana White’s x console but liked your legs better!

Wood tends to rise its general quality and character with the time passage. I would like to say that water wind rain snow possibly transform its porosity and texture and make it more attractive for a table piece. The attractiveness of this coffee table is the reason behind its mostly utilization. So, you can keep in mind this table as an excellent table.
Additionally, after becoming a journey level carpenter, you can go on to obtain master certification, which typically requires multiple years of consecutive experience as a journeyworker. This can help you earn a higher wage or qualify for teaching or management roles. You can even take on your own apprentices, allowing you to share your expertise with the next generation of professionals.
If you'd like to learn more about the differences between hardwood species, I can think of no better resource than R. Bruce Hoadley's 1980 masterpiece, Understanding Wood: A Craftsman's Guide to Wood Technology. Not only does Hoadley detail nearly every species used for woodworking, he does an exceptional job at describing how to prepare, work with and finish these hardwoods. This is an industry-standard resource, one that I'd highly recommend to every woodworker.
Carpenters are skilled craftspersons who create structures and consumer goods from common materials, like wood and concrete. Enrolling in carpentry courses at a trade school or community college is one way to gain the knowledge and techniques needed for a career as a carpenter. Skills learned in carpentry courses may include safety awareness, building layout design and blueprint reading. Continue reading for more information about carpentry courses. Schools offering Carpentry degrees can also be found in these popular choices.
I’ve been wanting an excuse to buy a Kreg Jig for probably a year now, and with a long DIY to-do list of building tables, benches, and more for our living and dining room, I decided now was a good time to make the purchase. This project is in no way sponsored by Kreg Jig, but I was so impressed with how much easier this tool made my life, I just had to share it with you guys! This tutorial (and probably most builds from here on out) will be shown using the Kreg Jig, so if you enjoy building things for your home, I highly recommend getting yourself one! You can purchase the kit I have here: Kreg Jig K4 Pocket Hole System.
There are three very important elements that must come together in making a project that will not only be pleasing to the eye, but will stand the test of time: good design, careful workmanship and meticulous selection of materials. You can continue to refine your design on paper, but at some point you will have to make that transition from a two dimensional drawing to selecting the lumber to use for each part. This can be one of the most difficult phases of any project and one that has the greatest effect on the final appearance of your finished piece.
The plan I’m using is a modified version of a table from Shabby Creek Cottage, and mine came out to be a whopping 46 1/2″ x 38 1/2″. It’s big, beautiful, and a perfect fit for our space, but if you don’t need a massive table like this one, you can either: make adjustments to these plans OR check out Gina’s table, which is quite a bit smaller. Okay, let’s build!

Afrormosia Alder Andiroba Anigre Ash Apple Aspen Avodire Balsa Beech Bilinga Birch African Blackwood Australian Blackwood Boxwood Bubinga Camphor Cedrela Cherry Chestnut Cocobolo Cumaru Ebony Elm Eucalyptus Hazel Hickory Hornbeam Idigbo Imbuia Ipê Iroko Jarra Jelutong Lignum vitae Linden (lime, basswood) Merbau Mahogany (American, African) Maple Meranti Oak Padauk Pear Plum Poplar Purpleheart Ovankol Ramin Red Quebracho Rosewood Rubberwood Sapele Teak Totara Utile Walnut Wenge Willow Zebrano
Description: In this four day class, we will start with rough lumber and finish with a simple box. Along the way we will teach you how to use the jointer, planer, table saw, and router table This is THE class to take if you are interested in getting started the right way in woodworking. This one will fill up fast, so sign up. soon. Woodworking 101 is strongly recommended for beginners and people looking to review the basics.

So, just like the lumberyard map, email your entries to me at [email protected], and to help sort through, put “Vacation Spot” in the subject line. It could be a Shaker village with outstanding furniture, the Giant Sequoias of Northern California or a quirky out-of-the-way museum or shop. This will be put up for public consumption just like the above map – I want everyone to find their lumber and see great woodworking.
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