I've found that it is easiest to attach the shelf by attaching the 2×2 side rails prior to connecting it to the table. To do this you'll sort of take a minor step back by removing the two lower 2×2 side rails (only 8 screws). Then drill the shelf to the 2×2's as shown below. Lift the shelf into place and attach each end of the shelf to the lower end rails using 2 1/2″ Kreg Screws. Once that is secure flip the table right side up and add the cross supports.

Liz Fourez started Love Grows Wild in 2012 with a passion for interior design and homemaking and a dream to help others create a home they love.  From simple project tutorials, to holiday and entertaining ideas, to her journey renovating a 1940’s farmhouse, Liz demonstrates how to create a beautiful and inviting home with a handmade touch. She turned her signature cozy, neutral style into a best-selling book in 2016 and continues to inspire readers with her captivating photography and easy decorating ideas. Read more about Liz > > > >
After you learn the basics from this video and article I encourage you to look at the bottom of this article for a list of links, books, and DVDs that will expand your understanding beyond the scope of this article. But this book is the best resource I have found so far: “Understanding Wood: A Craftsman’s Guide to Wood Technology” by R. Bruce Hoadley.
A successful joiner can see the full picture of the project he is preparing to run and for SCM woodworking machinery come to his aid with devices made especially for woodworking machinery; devices that allow to not having to perform the mathematical calculations necessary to make a precise angular cut on a circular saw (with our compex for example) or a template that can produce pieces that are exactly identical among them (on our lathe minimax t 124).
Rough lumber is sold and measured in ¼" increments; when a board is referred to as 4/4, it means it is four quarters of an inch thick, or one inch. The most common sizes you are likely to encounter at the lumber yard are 4/4 (1"), 6/4 (1½"), 8/4 (2") and 12/4 (3"). Generally, larger dimension lumber is priced per board foot. Price is also dependant upon the wood quality. Boards without blemishes, and of even colour, command higher prices. On most projects it isn't necessary to purchase the best grade material for the entire project. Purchasing a lower grade will allow you to bring home more lumber, and give you the freedom to lay out parts based on appearance rather than waste.

Make sure that as you work with machinery, you are wearing a face shield or safety goggles. If you are exposed to noise, use hearing protection to match the level of noise production. Gloves can protect your hands from splinters. If your woodworking machinery has a cover to protect the start and stop buttons, it is advisable to obtain one for yourself. This will protect the start buttons so that you do not accidentally activate machines.

More than a decade ago I spent 2 weeks in Maine aspiring to learn furniture making. On my return home I started enthusiastically planning to turn my basement into a proper shop – with all the “essential” tools I had learned to use. My list reflected my engineer’s preference for buying quality and quickly exceeded $25k in power tools alone (table saw, band saw, joiner, thickness planer, drill press…) even before solving the power, lighting and dust challenges.

Description: In this four day class, we will start with rough lumber and finish with a simple box. Along the way we will teach you how to use the jointer, planer, table saw, and router table This is THE class to take if you are interested in getting started the right way in woodworking. This one will fill up fast, so sign up. soon. Woodworking 101 is strongly recommended for beginners and people looking to review the basics.
The field of carpentry offers many opportunities for employment and advancement for workers with solid educational backgrounds and training. As work and educational experiences enhance your skill sets, you may earn the chance to advance to more responsibility and a higher salary. For example, you could be promoted to a general construction supervisor position within a larger construction company.
Description: Now that you have your new lathe tools, come join us to learn how to sharpen your chisels so that you can get the best performance from your equipment. You will be taught several different methods that can be used to keep your tools sharp and effective. You will be learning how to sharpen all of the basic lathe tools. This is a "must have" class for beginning woodturners.
Liz Fourez started Love Grows Wild in 2012 with a passion for interior design and homemaking and a dream to help others create a home they love.  From simple project tutorials, to holiday and entertaining ideas, to her journey renovating a 1940’s farmhouse, Liz demonstrates how to create a beautiful and inviting home with a handmade touch. She turned her signature cozy, neutral style into a best-selling book in 2016 and continues to inspire readers with her captivating photography and easy decorating ideas. Read more about Liz > > > >
Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!
Description: In this four day class, we will start with rough lumber and finish with a simple box. Along the way we will teach you how to use the jointer, planer, table saw, and router table This is THE class to take if you are interested in getting started the right way in woodworking. This one will fill up fast, so sign up. soon. Woodworking 101 is strongly recommended for beginners and people looking to review the basics.
Wood tends to rise its general quality and character with the time passage. I would like to say that water wind rain snow possibly transform its porosity and texture and make it more attractive for a table piece. The attractiveness of this coffee table is the reason behind its mostly utilization. So, you can keep in mind this table as an excellent table.
Screwdrivers are another must-have in the woodworker’s set of hand tools. Not only will you need Phillips and slot, or flathead screwdrivers, you’ll need star drivers and Torx drivers, too. A quality construction is vital to a good set of screwdrivers. So many of them are made out of soft metal, and the first time you put any “oomph” behind them, they strip out, becoming absolutely useless.
Congrats! You've finished your coffee-table. If you liked building it and are happy with the result you can find other similar designs at www.screwed-up.com. If you want to know what's going on with Screwed-Up you can join the facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/Screwed-Up-2092172627662047/), or maybe you want to follow me on pinterest (https://nl.pinterest.com/screwedupdiyfurniture/pins/). For finishing touches I recommend sanding the edges and corners smooth. Also treating the top with a (clear) wood finish to protect against spills is never a bad idea.
The topic of lumber confused me mainly because I couldn’t find a simple summary of the topic. I found a lot of complex discussions with different terms used by different “experts”. I am by no stretch of the imagination a lumber expert, but I’m very good at simplifying complex topics so that everyone can understand. As a result, this is a simple practical guide to help you understand how wood moves, what wood to buy, how to buy it, and where to buy it.
My $0.02 worth. I agree with the thickness planer [mine is 10″] but anything over a 6″ jointer is expensive and space-consuming, so use hand planes as in your later blog. I inherited an 8″ table saw that my dad and I used to build a 12′ outboard boat back in 1955. I’ve used it for ripping, but I’m having second thoughts because of safety issues. Some have suggested a band saw for ripping, which is quieter and safer to use. I gave my router away [and hope to get rid of my Freud biscuit joiner and 6″ jointer]. A quality eggbeater drill works every bit [pun not intended] as well as a power drill, and they cost less. A coping saw and a jewelers saw negate the need for a jigsaw unless you are into making puzzles. Chris Schwarz has a video short on one of the Highland Woodworker series showing how to joint the edge of a board with a plane and a simple jig on the workbench surface. Another reason to bypass the jointer.
In the sixty years of woodworking I have found two tools of increasing necessity. One is a band saw. I can do most of my work with a band saw and hand plane. The second tool is a bow saw, or actually several bow saws. They will replace the band saw if required, though they are slow. One I made about twenty years ago has a one and a half inch wide rip blade and is about thirty inches long. I think the blade is from an old industrial band saw blade I picked up and sharpened into a rip saw blade. It works very well on ripping lumber, logs, etc. Though it tires me out to much to use it now.
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