Dan, my work space that is available for power tools is quite small, about 6′ x 20′. It may seem like a lot on the surface, but a long rectangle is a bear to work in. It requires a lot of serpentine action. That said, I don’t have too much room for large footprint tools. I have settled finally on three big tools; a small bench saw, a thickness planer, and a drill press. I had to forgo the jointer, so I use hand tools to make up for it’s absence (as I do with a lot of my hand tool techniques). I have gotten to the point where I can flatten one side and true an edge of a board reasonably quick. I then finish it up with the thickness planer and table saw, giving me a nice flat board. I guess what I am basically saying is, there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and don’t write off hand tools as a quaint way to experience the past. They worked for thousands of years, and still do! Thanks for the blogs, they make for great reading.
Integrating a planter into a table is actually a pretty common idea. We’ve seen quite a few projects which include this feature and one of them comes from abeautifulmess. Check out the plans to find out how to put together with a minimalist and stylish coffee table with a planter at its center. You can use that space as a herb garden or you can plant grass or succulents in there. We really the crisp and linear design, the pureness of the white body and the strong contrast with the black legs and the green of the plants. It’s refreshing in a very special way.

I love this & your videos. It’s really helped my confidence level (as a total beginner.) I’ve built your floating shelves (LOVE them) and the cake stand you did (I’m adding dowels in the middle for the connecting parts so I can take it apart & store it almost flat & not worry about Velcro) I’m wondering if you’d do a console that matches this? I really like Ana White’s x console but liked your legs better!

You can make a coffee table stand out and be interesting from an aesthetic point of view without complicating its design too much. These plans from Abeautifulmess are a perfect example in that sense. This wooden coffee table definitely has what it takes to become a focal point for the living room and to serve as a statement piece for the entire space. Its design is a combination of sculptural and geometric beauty and a contrast between the solid and heavy top and the sleek and delicate hairpin legs.
The final building step is to lay each plank in place. These will be cut to 20” long each. Attach each piece using wood glue and brad nails. Just make sure the length the nails isn’t longer than the width of the planks and plywood combined. Once you have finished that, you can paint or stain and add your hardware!  Because I was using pre-finished white barn wood from Porter Barn Wood, I painted the table before adding the planks.  Check out these planks….
I consider this my “basic” tool list. Although I do not have a dedicated box for these tools, I assure you that they have a great home in cabinets, on shelves, and laying around on benches. When I do need to take my hand tools somewhere, the larger tools end up in a simple tongue and grooved latch box my grandfather owned. The smaller tools are always in my overall pockets. Overalls work great. They have multiple pockets, they’re comfortable, and they protect your upper body and legs. You only have to deal with small chunks of wood getting into the pockets, which can be dealt with if you or your other half are crafty enough to sew some flaps. It doesn’t bother me though. Thanks for your time.
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Apply glue to the ends of the 1 x 2 End Pieces for the Base and Apron, and then clamp them in place against the inside of the Leg. Position the pieces so that one runs flush with the top edge, and the other sets below the line marked in Step 7. Center both pieces on the leg, and tilt them so that they run parallel to the edge of the Leg. Using a drill/driver and 1¼-inch pocket holes screws, attach the pieces to the Leg. Repeat on the opposite end.
Table saws help the woodworkers rip, miter, crosscut, and bevel wood. The versatility of the tablesaw is what makes it so useful for the woodworker, making it the workhorse of any woodshop. A tablesaw has a heavy but smooth surface and is made of cast iron to keep it stable. The tablesaw also has two handles: one raises and lowers the blade and the other adjusts angles for the saw. The second handle also enables dust collection.
First, build two boxes for each leg assembly. These are attached using wood glue and 2.5” pocket hole screws through the horizontal boards and into the vertical boards.  You want your pocket holes facing the outside of the box on this part because we will cover them with another board on the next part.  We used our K5 Kreg Jig for this part.  We get asked ALL the time which Kreg Jig to start with.  We always suggest the K5.  We use it on almost every build.  You can find it HERE on Amazon!

Along with your materials, there will usually be practical exercises that you can do at home. Illustrated textbooks and study guides, along with instructional videos, will guide you through construction techniques step-by-step. And if you still need additional help, you can always contact your instructor via phone, e-mail, chat or some other method.


Often referred to as Douglas Fir, this wood has a straight, pronounced grain, and has a reddish brown tint to it. Fir is most often used for building; however, it’s inexpensive and can be used for some furniture-making as well. It doesn’t have the most interesting grain pattern and doesn’t take stain very well, so it’s best to use it only when you intend to paint the finished product. Douglas fir is moderately strong and hard for a softwood, rating 4 on a scale of 1 to 4.
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