Description: Every woodturner enjoys the opportunity to give handmade ornaments to friends and family during the holidays, especially one that is made purely out of wood. No pre-made ornament kits or ornament hardware will be used in this class. One might call it au naturel!!!! During this class you will be given the opportunity to see various ornaments that have been turned on the lathe, ranging from small and simple to large and more decorative. Class objectives include, but are not limited to, the following: Wood choice (more common ornament wood species and pros and cons of each) Discussion and demonstration on how ornaments can be colored using a variety of markers, paints, dyes, and gilder's paste. Discuss and demonstrate how a variety of gouges and tools can be used to make ornaments, including texturing tools. Sharpening techniques - the instructor will assist all students when sharpening tools Ornament rough sketch and design, before the wood is on the lathe. Most important, every student in class will be given the opportunity to turn at least one ornament of their own. The instructor will assist with basic sketch and design, and will rotate among all students to assist with cuts, tool use, technique, sharpening, and helpful hints. Experience level: Beginner (some turning experience highly preferred) Suggested tools: Turning tools will be supplied; however, students are encourage to bring their own tools if they have them. 3/8" or 1/2" spindle gouge, narrow parting tool, and small roughing gouge is a great start. Students who wish to bring their own chuck may do so as well (1"-8 tpi, 2" or 50mm dovetail jaws, and pin jaws). Lunch break from 12:00 to 12:45
The sequence in which boards are cut from a log will determine how stable the boards will be once they dry. As a board loses moisture it will shrink in three dimensions. The change in length is so small as to be considered insignificant and the change in radial movement is always less than the tangential movement. This is most significant as the wood dries between the time it's cut (i.e. green wood), and the point where it is kiln dried or air dried and ready for use. Wood that shrinks excessively, or that has been dried improperly, will often develop checks at the ends. When shopping for lumber, carefully inspect the ends for any checking, or for excessively long checks. It is best to allow for some scrap at the end of each board, just in case. As you trim the end, hit the off-cut across the edge of your bench, and if it breaks in two, you'll have to cut off a little more.
Solid wood will always remain a top choice where furniture is concerned. Its unique texture, sturdiness and resilience in time improves and add warmth and coziness to any home. Even though it might be considered rustic and rudimental, in some cases the bold contrast between a modern interior design scheme and a solid piece of wood is to be desired.
Second, I have another call for entries – I have, for some time, wanted to make a “Woodworker’s Vacation Map,” one that would list and plot a wide array of interesting places and sights across the world. Whenever I travel, I ask a few woodworking friends from the area I’m traveling to what I should see. This has exposed me to a wide range of beautiful experiences, often tucked away and lacking signage.
Introductory carpentry classes provide students with an overview of the methods and technologies used in residential and light commercial carpentry and are typically taken at the beginning of a carpentry program. Hands-on experience and lectures make up the class content, which can cover building codes, site layout, estimating, interior and exterior finishes, framing and cabinetry. Additional subjects of instruction may include footing and foundation forming, concrete specifications, OSHA/WISHA construction safety standards and basic carpentry math.
Modern pallet coffee table is simply an enticing choice go with. You can learn how to combine a wooden coffee table in interior design that is modern without creating the impression of bold contrast. You should take steps such as finish the raw pallet accurately, add glass to and set of wheels, coat of fresh paint that is white glossy, and your furniture piece possibly will fit in perfectly.
There are no formal education or training requirements to become a carpenter in the U.S., but the BLS reports that three to four years of experience is the industry standard for becoming a skilled craftsperson. Training and experience can be acquired by working with an experienced journeyman or through an apprenticeship offered by an employer or labor union. Formal in-class instruction is offered through certificate, diploma or associate's degree programs in carpentry at trade or vocational schools. Employees with some formal carpentry education generally start at higher positions in the field. Carpentry courses may include carpentry math, building layouts, foundation work, roofing, stair construction, siding and moldings. You can also study interior and exterior finishes.
Cut 2- 1x6 46" boards, mitered at 45 degrees on each end (measurement is taken on long side). Cut 2- 1x6 17" boards, mitered at 45 degrees on each end (measurement is taken on long side). Drill pocket holes in both ends of each board. Drill several pocket holes (3 or 4) on the INSIDE edges of each board. Spread wood glue on the edges of each board, and sandwich them together, using bar clamps to keep them tight. Using 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the 1x4's together. (see photo on previous step)

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Industrial carpenters work on civil engineering projects and in industrial settings, where they build scaffolding and create and set forms for pouring concrete. Some industrial carpenters build tunnel bracing or partitions in underground passageways and mines to control the circulation of air to worksites. Others build concrete forms for tunnels, bridges, dams, power plants, and sewers.
A coffee table with storage can be a really useful addition to a small living room or pretty much just any lounge space. After all, you can never have too much storage. So let’s see what it takes to build such a table. Well, you could repurpose some elements from an old cabinet if you have any. An already existing drawer could be the starting point for your project. Have a look at these plans from rogueengineer for more inspiration.
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Wednesday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Wednesday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
There are often situations when the original message asks for opinions: "What is the best widget for my type of shop?". To a certain extent, the person posting the message is responsible for including specific questions within the message. An open ended question (like the one above) invites responses that may read as sales pitches. WOODWEB suggests that companies responding to such a question provide detailed and substantive replies rather than responses that read as a one-sided product promotion. It has been WOODWEB's experience that substantive responses are held in higher regard by our readers (return to top).
I love this & your videos. It’s really helped my confidence level (as a total beginner.) I’ve built your floating shelves (LOVE them) and the cake stand you did (I’m adding dowels in the middle for the connecting parts so I can take it apart & store it almost flat & not worry about Velcro) I’m wondering if you’d do a console that matches this? I really like Ana White’s x console but liked your legs better!
Hardwoods come from deciduous, or broad-leaved trees, as opposed to softwoods, that are harvested from from evergreens. In general, the lumber derived from hardwood species are typically harder than softwoods, although there are exceptions (balsa wood is very light and soft, but is considered a hardwood). Most hardwood tree species lose their leaves in winter, and generally offer a much wider variety of colors and textures than softwoods. Typically, stock from hardwood species are a lot more expensive than those from softwoods.

I am finally getting to practice my woodworking more after years of collecting tools. By using tool reviews and thinking of the kind of work I would like to do, I have accumulated a nice set of tools without purchasing many mistakes. I decided to use Paul Sellers book and videos and start learning from the beginning. He starts with projects that begin with a small set of tools. One of those tools is a spokeshave. Even though I know much of what is in the first lessons, I have picked up a few new tricks, and am learning to use my tools more efficiently. My most important tools are my workbench and vise. The workbench was tough to build as I was on the floor using hand planes; not a good way to work. I have no jointer; did get a small planer and made a sled for it so I can flatten a board. My tools are in my house, so there is no room for a big table saw or bandsaw. I have a chopsaw and a piece of an old Craftsman tablesaw I got for free. It has to be moved outside to use. A circular saw with a guide is handy. My guide has a plate on which the saw is mounted. The plate slides on aluminum angle (with help of rollers) which is screwed to plywood. Once the initial cut is made in the plywood, the plywood is simply lined up with your cut marks and clamped down.
Whether you are a beginner or a DIY professional, if you have a love for the craft of woodworking The Home Depot has got you covered. We have all the essential tools for woodworking that let you hone your craft. Our huge selection of drill presses and miter saws will put the power in your hands to complete your projects faster and easier. And whether you are looking for the strength of a powerful router or the versatility of a lathe, you can find everything you need to help with projects, large and small. If your carpentry plans also include building materials, you don't need to look any further than The Home Depot. From wood and lumber to decking and fencing materials, it's all right here.
I’m currently working on a dining room table with this color in mind (I also plan on a coffee table soon). I’ve been testing out stain colors and dark walnut is currently in the lead. I love the way this coffee table turned out in color. How many coats of stain did you use? Also, did the dark wax make a big difference in color? I was planning on using a satin poly for sealant (mostly because it’s what is most convenient and what I’m accustomed to), but I’m interested in the dark wax after seeing this post. Any recommendations you have are much appreciated.
If desired, add decorative trim pieces to your coffee table. We used an x pattern, but you can leave it as-is if desired. Simply dry fit your pattern into the side panels of your coffee table. Then attach using wood glue and brad nails. After your pieces have been added, fill any holes. Once your wood filler is dry, sand with 120 grit sandpaper. Then stain or paint and finish with a polyurethane.
Whether you are a beginner or a DIY professional, if you have a love for the craft of woodworking The Home Depot has got you covered. We have all the essential tools for woodworking that let you hone your craft. Our huge selection of drill presses and miter saws will put the power in your hands to complete your projects faster and easier. And whether you are looking for the strength of a powerful router or the versatility of a lathe, you can find everything you need to help with projects, large and small. If your carpentry plans also include building materials, you don't need to look any further than The Home Depot. From wood and lumber to decking and fencing materials, it's all right here.
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Poplar is one of the less expensive hardwoods. It’s also fairly soft (1 in hardness on a scale of 1 to 5), which makes it easy to work with. Poplar is white with some green or brown streaks in the heartwood. Because poplar is not the most beautiful wood, it’s rarely used in fine furniture, and if it is, it’s almost always painted. Poplar can be a good choice for drawers (where it won’t be seen) because it is stable and inexpensive. You can find poplar at larger home centers, but a lumberyard will have a better selection.
Maple comes in two varieties: hard and soft. Both varieties are harder than many other woods; hard maple is so hard (a 5 on a scale of 1 to 5) that it’s difficult to work with. Soft maple, on the other hand, is relatively easy to work with. Because of their fine, straight grain, both varieties are more stable than many other woods. They also tend to be less expensive than other hardwoods. You won’t find maple at your local home center, but most lumberyards have a good selection of it.

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1. Power jointer and thickness planer. I have developed various means of straightening the edges of my stock with hand-held tools, but I don’t see a way to efficiently flatten the faces of rough or reclaimed lumber without a power jointer. It’s part of the first few steps for any furniture project, and I want to be able to move through this step quickly and into the more interesting work. The thickness planer is also a huge time-saver, compared to hand-held tools.
While this coffee table instruction is free, I'm trying to make a living with these. I care about the quality of each piece and a lot of work went into designing the pieces and making the instructions so unfortunately I have to ask a little money for the other instructions. However when put into the perspective of a whole DIY furniture project I guess it shouldn't make that big of dent in your budget.

Dan, my work space that is available for power tools is quite small, about 6′ x 20′. It may seem like a lot on the surface, but a long rectangle is a bear to work in. It requires a lot of serpentine action. That said, I don’t have too much room for large footprint tools. I have settled finally on three big tools; a small bench saw, a thickness planer, and a drill press. I had to forgo the jointer, so I use hand tools to make up for it’s absence (as I do with a lot of my hand tool techniques). I have gotten to the point where I can flatten one side and true an edge of a board reasonably quick. I then finish it up with the thickness planer and table saw, giving me a nice flat board. I guess what I am basically saying is, there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and don’t write off hand tools as a quaint way to experience the past. They worked for thousands of years, and still do! Thanks for the blogs, they make for great reading.

Cut 2- 1x6 46" boards, mitered at 45 degrees on each end (measurement is taken on long side). Cut 2- 1x6 17" boards, mitered at 45 degrees on each end (measurement is taken on long side). Drill pocket holes in both ends of each board. Drill several pocket holes (3 or 4) on the INSIDE edges of each board. Spread wood glue on the edges of each board, and sandwich them together, using bar clamps to keep them tight. Using 1 1/4" pocket hole screws, attach the 1x4's together. (see photo on previous step)
To best engage with designers and architects, Northwest Hardwoods has expanded its social media reach to include Instagram and Pinterest. Both channels are visually based and aspirational, which will allow Northwest Hardwoods to showcase not only its many types of wood grades and species, but also the beautiful and varied applications for these woods – from cabinets to decking to furniture.
You’ll need a long screwdriver with a square blade that is very heavy duty. This gives you a lot of torque. You’ll also need a small and medium slot screwdriver. For working on cabinets or tight places in woodworking, you’ll need a screwdriver with a thin shank so that you can reach screws that are inside of deep holes. This is accomplished with a cabinet screwdriver. Get a couple of medium Phillips head screwdrivers, and a stubby one too, for those tight places. You may also want a ratcheting screwdriver.
Products and systems by Lamello have always been Products and systems by Lamello have always been designed for longevity and reliability. This legendary durability is combined with environmental stewardship in view as strict environmental regulations at our production site in Switzerland ensure that all resources are used with consideration many of them stemming from sustainable husbandry and management. ...  More + Product Details Close
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1: Table saw in place of a jointer. Any number of tips in previous issues address straightening edges of boards without a jointer. A jointer serves one purpose, but a tablesaw can serve many (just watch your local Craigslist for a decent one to come up.) The thickness planer is unavoidable, but until you can afford one, buy stock in the thickness you need.
Lots of good comments! I do think it is a bit of stretch to include a jointer and surface planner on the ‘basics’ list – we’ve got a slippery slope here! And a lot of different approaches – money, space, time, resources, etc. But lets plunge ahead. If you buy your wood already (or mostly) prep’ed, then the jointer & surface planner can be postponed. You definitely need a way to accurately measure linear distances (e.g. length, width) so a good ruler and tape measure. You need to be able to measure squareness – so you need a good combination square. You need to be able to mark the wood – so a good marking knife, an awl, some chalk, a fine pencil, etc. You should have some decent chisels (and good ones don’t need to cost a lot!). You will need to sharpen them (again not expensive – piece of plate glass and some sandpaper). You need a way to accurately cut your wood – a couple of good handsaws and a file or two for sharpening. You really should have a decent work surface/work bench/etc – a good first project by the way. Last of the basics – a good drill (3/8″ vs battery type). Lastly (I could go on but room is lacking), take a look at Paul Seller’s video’s for simple but highly competent work.
Poplar is one of the less expensive hardwoods. It’s also fairly soft (1 in hardness on a scale of 1 to 5), which makes it easy to work with. Poplar is white with some green or brown streaks in the heartwood. Because poplar is not the most beautiful wood, it’s rarely used in fine furniture, and if it is, it’s almost always painted. Poplar can be a good choice for drawers (where it won’t be seen) because it is stable and inexpensive. You can find poplar at larger home centers, but a lumberyard will have a better selection.
Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!
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