The plan I’m using is a modified version of a table from Shabby Creek Cottage, and mine came out to be a whopping 46 1/2″ x 38 1/2″. It’s big, beautiful, and a perfect fit for our space, but if you don’t need a massive table like this one, you can either: make adjustments to these plans OR check out Gina’s table, which is quite a bit smaller. Okay, let’s build!

We cut the decorative diagonal pieces to fit on this part. Mark each board with your pencil and cut them to fit exact. You can check out the video if you have questions about this part! We walk you through it. Cut the diagonal pieces to fit first, then mark and attach them to each other using wood glue and nails. Then, fit them in the box and attach them with wood glue and nails through the box and into each end of the X piece.
Basic woodworking tools are different from beginner woodworking tools. For one thing, I don’t like to use the word “beginner” unless I am using it accurately. It’s not a very useful label, in my opinion, because it implies that there are clear-cut and hierarchical steps in your growth as a woodworker. Who wants to return to grade school during his or her valuable shop time? So I only use the word “beginner” when I’m talking about someone who is touching woodworking tools for the first time.

The last step is to dry brush over top of the white washed surface. Using a dry brush, I used the same linen white chalk paint from Rust-Oleum and dipped the tip of the brush into the paint. Getting just a little paint on the end of the brush, I then dabbed the brush onto a piece of scrap wood to take off any excess paint. Then, going with the grain of the wood, I used quick strokes. You can add more or less depending on the look you desire!


The beverage pallet coffee table is one of the most significant choices for your living room if you live to entertain. It comprises a built-in space for the bucket of the ice storage that possibly keeps your drinks fresh and cold, space which can be tucked away and be covered up when necessary. In this case beverage pallet coffee table is best for you.

This is the side table version of the stylish project we shared previously. In certain configurations, it could function as a coffee table. It’s a design suitable for small spaces. The wooden top has this hollow storage compartment which is great for keeping things like a book, a magazine, the remote control or the phone when relaxing on the sofa. The hairpin legs give the table a slender look.

When I started planning this makeover, I knew I wanted to get rid of the glass coffee table I had and go with something more rustic and cozy… something with beautiful wood grain that looks like it’s been in an old farmhouse somewhere for ages. So rather than searching every single antique store in town or buying something off the shelf at a big box store, I gathered up my tools, picked up some lumber, and made myself a new coffee table! 

Second, I have another call for entries – I have, for some time, wanted to make a “Woodworker’s Vacation Map,” one that would list and plot a wide array of interesting places and sights across the world. Whenever I travel, I ask a few woodworking friends from the area I’m traveling to what I should see. This has exposed me to a wide range of beautiful experiences, often tucked away and lacking signage.
The lumber industry uses the “Janka hardness test” to test and rate common woods for hardness. The test involves pressing a steel ball to gauge how much pressure each wood species takes to push the ball half way into the wood. You can download my free PDF of the Janka chart here. {If you can’t open a PDF then install the free Adobe PDF Reader here.}
The topic of lumber confused me mainly because I couldn’t find a simple summary of the topic. I found a lot of complex discussions with different terms used by different “experts”. I am by no stretch of the imagination a lumber expert, but I’m very good at simplifying complex topics so that everyone can understand. As a result, this is a simple practical guide to help you understand how wood moves, what wood to buy, how to buy it, and where to buy it.
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You might not see these tables very often but they were relied on by sheep farmers for many years. Anything that could make the job of shearing sheep easier was welcomed on the farm. You could even change up the plan a little bit by making the legs longer and adding steel (or wooden) wheels to make a merchants cart. That latter idea is something we are suggesting, its not a part of this plan. Joinery methods used primarily in the construction of this sturdy table include mortise and tenon and tongue and groove. View the Larger Image Slideshow to see the actual paper plan you are buying.
Even though this is in fact a side table, we can definitely find inspiration in its design. We find this project to be highly creative and interesting. The table has a hexagon-shaped top and bottom connected by two sets of five rods. Two in each set are longer than the other and go through the bottom hexagon, acting as legs. You can find the plans for this project on ohohblog.
Carpentry is one of the most flexible and versatile construction occupations. As a graduate of a carpentry school online, you may work on a wide variety of projects, both indoors and outdoors—from installing kitchen cabinets and drywall to helping construct large-scale projects from the ground up. That versatility is helping to drive job growth: the U.S. Department of Labor expects carpentry careers to grow 8% by 2026.*
Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!

If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.


Just a little nitpick on the tape measure blurb. The hook should not be completely tight. It should move in and out about a 1/16th or the thickness of the hook. This way you get an accurate measurement whether you hook a part to measure or bump up to it. If you want more accurate measurements with a tape measure, “burn” an inch instead of hooking or bumping the part. Just line up what you want to measure with the 1″ mark and subtract that inch from the final measurement.
Most carpenter classes and courses lead to a certificate or associate's degree. Graduates can work in many different specialty areas including residential and commercial carpentry. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1 in 3 carpenters are self-employed, so some courses include basic business skills for carpenters like cost estimating and project planning. Primarily, however, students will learn about tools, materials and building techniques.

This project actually started with me wanting to build a chair for myself, however I lacked advanced woodworking tools and a workshop. I therefore began making furniture that was as straightforward as possible and could be build easily with simple tools. Most importantly, all parts could be cut at the DIY store where I got my plywood. This meant I didn't need a saw bench or lots of space. The cut parts were easy to transport to my home and I could pretty much build the whole chair on the kitchen table. This inspired me to make other furniture pieces in similar fashion. 
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