One name rang out like a bell at multiple forums, from many different woodworkers: Steve Wall Lumber. From what we read (NOT direct experience!) it looks like the only way you can go wrong with Wall Lumber is if they don’t have what you’re looking for. The other frequently-cited lumber sellers are worth looking into for sure, as it’s always good to have multiple sources!
The course begins with a quick overview of the history of carpentry, from primitive to modern times. It then teaches you about the most important building materials, fasteners, adhesives, and tools used by carpenters in the modern construction industry. You will then receive an essential outline of safety guidelines and procedures. The course then goes through the crucial steps carpenters must take during construction projects. Here, you will be introduced to the best methods for constructing floor systems, walls, and roof framing, as well as how to make and read plans and elevations. The final section of the course shows you how to close off a structure, including installing windows, exterior doors, and stairs.
Description: In this session, I will be demonstrating over 20 ways to mount wood on the lathe for turning. Starting with different methods between centers, I will demonstrate single axis, as well as multi-axis turning. Discussion will then move to various ways to use faceplates, to safely hold your wood blank on the lathe. We will then progress to scroll chucks and screw center usage. Next, will be conversation on the use of homemade chucks, jam chucks, collets and mandrels. I will then demonstrate the use of vacuum chucks, jumbo jaws, doughnut chucks, and Longworth style chucks, and finish up with the use of various types of steady rests, including ring-style, bowl steadies, and spindle supports. This class is geared toward the turner who is interested in learning many different ways to mount pieces of wood in the lathe, and what the advantages or disadvantages might be of different techniques. The student will be expected to watch and learn, but also get involved in the discussion regarding chucking methods, and share some of their experiences as well. This class is designed for all turners, wanting to learn. Please bring eye protection to class.

It's good practice to purchase all of your lumber for a project at the same time. By doing this, you can acclimatize all the lumber to the same relative humidity level. More importantly, the wood will likely be of a more consistent appearance. Some woods, cherry in particular, can have extreme changes in colour and figure from one tree to the next. Trying to find a few more boards with the same appearance can be an exercise in frustration. The shopping list ensures that you will purchase enough stock for your project the first time.
Basic woodworking tools are different from beginner woodworking tools. For one thing, I don’t like to use the word “beginner” unless I am using it accurately. It’s not a very useful label, in my opinion, because it implies that there are clear-cut and hierarchical steps in your growth as a woodworker. Who wants to return to grade school during his or her valuable shop time? So I only use the word “beginner” when I’m talking about someone who is touching woodworking tools for the first time.
Just a little nitpick on the tape measure blurb. The hook should not be completely tight. It should move in and out about a 1/16th or the thickness of the hook. This way you get an accurate measurement whether you hook a part to measure or bump up to it. If you want more accurate measurements with a tape measure, “burn” an inch instead of hooking or bumping the part. Just line up what you want to measure with the 1″ mark and subtract that inch from the final measurement.
This small coffee table is ideal for a side table or end table. The table is designed with the home handyman in mind. It is both easy to build and is very sturdy. The minimum tools required to construct this coffee table are... Pencil; square; measuring tape; handsaw; hammer; chisel; a couple of clamps and lots of sandpaper. Most handymen are likely to have those tools in their arsenal. Of course... it would make life easier if you also happened to have a drop-saw and a belt sander. The wood used for this coffee table was 90mm x 45mm (1 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches) dressed/surfaced cedar. Cedar is reddish in color, light and easy to work with. Other wood can be used. Virtually any wood can be used for this project, just allow for different widths and thicknesses, and also take into account, the finish. Is the table to be painted, stained and/or coated with polyurethane? Obviously, if the table is to be painted, then an inferior and less expensive wood can be used, as imperfections (within reason) can be filled and painted over.
The final building step is to lay each plank in place. These will be cut to 20” long each. Attach each piece using wood glue and brad nails. Just make sure the length the nails isn’t longer than the width of the planks and plywood combined. Once you have finished that, you can paint or stain and add your hardware!  Because I was using pre-finished white barn wood from Porter Barn Wood, I painted the table before adding the planks.  Check out these planks….
×