Hardwoods come from deciduous, or broad-leaved trees, as opposed to softwoods, that are harvested from from evergreens. In general, the lumber derived from hardwood species are typically harder than softwoods, although there are exceptions (balsa wood is very light and soft, but is considered a hardwood). Most hardwood tree species lose their leaves in winter, and generally offer a much wider variety of colors and textures than softwoods. Typically, stock from hardwood species are a lot more expensive than those from softwoods.


A carpenter is someone who builds and repairs residential, commercial, or industrial structures. These structures can range from homes to commercial buildings to roads and can include individual components such as cabinets, staircases, doorframes, building foundations, and much more. And, although you may think that this occupation only requires physical strength and basic technical skills, carpentry actually requires a strong foundation of specialized expertise and experience in order to ensure that all jobs are completed in accordance with local, state, and national building codes.
You can make a coffee table stand out and be interesting from an aesthetic point of view without complicating its design too much. These plans from Abeautifulmess are a perfect example in that sense. This wooden coffee table definitely has what it takes to become a focal point for the living room and to serve as a statement piece for the entire space. Its design is a combination of sculptural and geometric beauty and a contrast between the solid and heavy top and the sleek and delicate hairpin legs.
Having completed this course the learner will be able to: - Describe the history and scope of carpentry as a trade; - Identify the opportunities for carpenters in the construction industry; - Classify the various building materials used by carpenters; - List the most commonly used fasteners and adhesives used by people in the carpentry trade; - Explain the different types of hand and power tools available to carpenters; - Outline the general safety procedures and guidelines that should be followed to operate the tools; - Discuss the importance of employee responsibility and human relations to being successful in the trade; - Identify the various types of construction drawings that make a drawing set; - State the guidelines to read and interpret reading plans and drawings, blueprints, and specifications; - List the various terms associated with floor systems, wall, ceiling and roof framing; - Explain the different methods of framing and constructing houses made of wood; - Describe the types of beams/girders and supports used in construction; - Outline the sequence involved in constructing a platform floor assembly; - Summarize the basic procedure for laying out, assembling, and erecting wood frame walls; - Recognize the different types of roofs used in residential construction; - Determine the length of a common rafter required to construct a roof; - Discuss the terms associated with concrete, concrete reinforcing materials, and formwork; - Apply the concrete mixing information to get different types of concrete, designed to suit various purposes; - Explain the basic concrete curing methods and materials; - List the various components of windows, exterior doors, and stairways used in residential construction; - Summarize the basic installation procedure for pre-hung windows; - State the various types of exterior doors used in residential construction; - Identify the essential requirements for framing stairs; - Describe the design and layout techniques used for stairways and stairwells.
Not all species are available in quarter sawn form from all dealers, but it can be possible to cut parts from wider boards to accomplish the same end. At the lumberyard I will often look for wider planks for this very reason. When a wide board is cut from the log it will have some vertical grain on the outer edges and some face grain in the center of the board. By purchasing enough stock and carefully laying out the parts it would be possible to use quarter sawn material for all visible parts. Decisions like this must often be made at the lumberyard based on the stock on hand. It is a way to stretch your material budget a little further, by buying a lower grade and resawing it for appearance back in the shop.
Teak is becoming rarer as the days go on, but it is the staple for fine outdoor furniture. Teak is highly weather-resistant and beautiful (not to mention expensive — can you believe almost $24 a board foot?). Teak has an oily feel and a golden-brown color. It rates a 3 on a scale of 1 to 5 for hardness and is only available from larger lumberyards and specialty suppliers.
Now it’s time to attach the top of the table. Line up the 1×6 boards and place the frame you built upside down and centered on the boards. Drill 1 1/4″ screws through the supports into each board to secure them to the table. I used regular wood screws for this step originally, but the heads were sinking into the supports and not pulling the top boards down tight like I wanted. So I swapped them out for the Kreg Jig screws, which have washer heads, and they worked like a charm. If you’re having trouble getting those top boards secured tight, I’d try switching to the Kreg Jig screws!
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It all depends on the program. Some programs are designed for those already working in the construction industry. Other programs are open to anyone, regardless of their background. Some classes have a specific date by which you must have all of your work completed. Others impose no time limits and give you an unlimited timeframe to complete your work.

One name rang out like a bell at multiple forums, from many different woodworkers: Steve Wall Lumber. From what we read (NOT direct experience!) it looks like the only way you can go wrong with Wall Lumber is if they don’t have what you’re looking for. The other frequently-cited lumber sellers are worth looking into for sure, as it’s always good to have multiple sources!

This course introduces students to remodeling practices and demolitions. Students learn how to plan a remodeling project, complete basic plumbing and electrical jobs, apply for permits, match finished materials and estimate costs. Instruction in reading architectural blueprints for residential remodels is generally included, and students become familiar with specifications, codes and construction drawings. Some residential remodeling courses provide hands-on learning experience by requiring group or individual remodeling projects. This course is usually taken after basic carpentry courses.
Aside from pallets, lots of other things can also be repurposed into components for a DIY coffee table. For example, this one has a tile top. The frame is made of wood and can be crafted in no time. In fact, you can use some leftover wood pieces and if you also have an extra tile from previous renovations this can prove to be a cheap coffee table which you can build with things you already own.

If you want to store something in your home, and who is not, you are going to famine to take a closer look at free crate store coffee table plan that involves two crates that slip inside. From different website related to the coffee table, you can download blueprints for this table that involves everything you consider important and need to build it.
Lumber for your projects can come from many sources, but before you can use it to build anything, it must be dry. Lumber that is kiln dried will have a moisture content right out of the kiln of 7 or 8%. However, by the time the lumber is delivered to your local dealer and arrives at your shop, the moisture content may have changed dramatically. Storage conditions between the kiln and your shop are clearly out of your control, so it is always a good idea after purchasing lumber to acclimatize it in your shop for several weeks. To avoid using lumber that is still in the process of adjusting to its new environment it is best to use a moisture meter to verify the moisture content of the wood. Most dealers don't mind customers checking the moisture content at the yard as long as they are using a pinless meter. The meter in my lumber kit uses electromagnetic waves to calculate the moisture content of a given piece of wood. Its use couldn't be simpler or quicker – simply turn it on, enter the species, and place the meter on the wood to be measured. The result is displayed right on the screen instantly without the need for conversion tables and other calculations. Typically, I check a couple of areas on each board as I select them just to confirm they are all in the same moisture range. Back at the shop I once more check each piece of wood and note it in chalk on the board. Every few days I'll recheck the boards, and when the readings have stabilized, I can be reasonably certain there won't be any surprises when I start the milling process.
Description: This workshop is designed for those who have recently gotten a wood lathe, or have had one for a while, and haven't gotten around to using it until now. During this workshop students get acquainted with the wood lathe and its parts and accessories. We will cover the turning process, as well as sanding and applying finish to a project while it's on the lathe. Students will also be shown a variety of turning tools and how they function. You will also be introduced to wood selection, tool selection, and tool sharpening. Students will test their skills while working on a small turning project. Students should bring suitable eye protection such as safety glasses, goggles, or a face shield. If you have problems with wood dust, a respirator or dust mask would be advisable. Also bring any wood turning tools you might have. Tools and safety gear will be provided for those who don't own them. Materials for turning will be provided.

If you have already completed some college or university education, then many apprenticeship programs will give you credit for prior learning. You can even receive credit for work experience you possess in the construction field. It is important to note that any education and work experience credits will likely be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, so if you want to explore this option, then checking around for the best use of your experience is key.

Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck!
I’m currently working on a dining room table with this color in mind (I also plan on a coffee table soon). I’ve been testing out stain colors and dark walnut is currently in the lead. I love the way this coffee table turned out in color. How many coats of stain did you use? Also, did the dark wax make a big difference in color? I was planning on using a satin poly for sealant (mostly because it’s what is most convenient and what I’m accustomed to), but I’m interested in the dark wax after seeing this post. Any recommendations you have are much appreciated.
You can make a coffee table stand out and be interesting from an aesthetic point of view without complicating its design too much. These plans from Abeautifulmess are a perfect example in that sense. This wooden coffee table definitely has what it takes to become a focal point for the living room and to serve as a statement piece for the entire space. Its design is a combination of sculptural and geometric beauty and a contrast between the solid and heavy top and the sleek and delicate hairpin legs.
A Guide to Honing and Sharpening helps woodworkers keep their tools in the best possible working condition. It focuses on the history of honing and sharpening and vital aspects of these practices, such as stropping, beveling, chiseling, flattening and other modern technological methods. Students can explore these methods via text, pictures and diagrams. 

So, just like the lumberyard map, email your entries to me at [email protected], and to help sort through, put “Vacation Spot” in the subject line. It could be a Shaker village with outstanding furniture, the Giant Sequoias of Northern California or a quirky out-of-the-way museum or shop. This will be put up for public consumption just like the above map – I want everyone to find their lumber and see great woodworking. 
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